Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Editors' Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

In the field of oral history, Kentucky is a national leader. Over the past several decades, tens of thousands of its citizens have been interviewed. Kentucky Remembered brings into print the most important of those collections, with each volume focusing on a particular subject....

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xx

This book documents aspects of everyday life on Kentucky family farms as experienced from about 1920 to 1950. The focus is on the foodways, which means that discussions of food production, preparation, and preservation dominate most chapters. The book is based largely on interviews conducted in the early 1990s by the Kentucky Family Farm Oral History Project in an effort to create a record of past life in rural Kentucky. ...

read more

1 Farms and Rural Life in Kentucky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-12

The image many people have of rural America is of the family farm. The role of the family farm in the creation of American social values is important. It is seen as a "storehouse of the traditional values that built the nation; self-reliance, resourcefulness, civic pride, family strength, concern for neighbors and community, honesty, and friendliness" (Garkovich, Bokemeier, and Foote 1995,9). Because it is a source...

read more

2 In the Kitchen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-38

Work in both kitchen and field started early in the morning. Daily chores were often completed before breakfast was eaten. Breakfast cooking required that the woodstove be fired up. "They always got up before daylight. They would milk by lantern light, lots of times. While Daddy went to the barn to milk Mother would get breakfast. And you had to get your stove hot to bake your biscuits. It would take a long...

read more

3 Housework

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-70

The effort, knowledge, and skills required to operate a Kentucky farm household of this era were substantial. This effort was largely unaided by labor-saving machinery, and most of the work was done by women. When the food was cooked, the dishes done, the clothes washed and ironed, and the children properly tended to, these women would then take their place alongside their husbands hoeing corn or stripping tobacco. Housework was a crucial aspect of the total farm enterprise. Without the efforts of women, the system would not work....

read more

4 Farmwork

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-100

"There's a time for everything. You got to work, well, you know the old-time people always said, you got to make hay while the sun shines. There's times for all things" (Clara Garrison, Bourbon County). To capture what Mrs. Garrison was saying, we collected statements about different tasks performed at different times of the year and assembled the following outline of the annual cycle of farming, gardening, and food preservation....

read more

5 Garden Spots and Fruit Trees

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-114

Gardening was an important part of the household's economic strategy, and some farms also had orchards and grape arbors. Fresh garden and orchard produce sustained families during the summer, and these foods were preserved to last the family over the long winter until spring. Christine Sims said, "It would be an amazement to people today how little...

read more

6 Tending the Field Crops

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-150

Farms usually produced either corn or wheat, and often both. Although much of this grain was sold, these crops were also raised to be consumed at home as meal or flour or, in the case of corn, as animal feed. The amount of grains grown varied from region to region. Eastern Kentucky narrators often talked about corn and the work involved in producing it, so it is clear that corn was important in the mountains....

read more

7 Keeping Livestock

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-178

A farm was considered incomplete without livestock, and virtually every farm had a diversity of animals. The purpose of livestock was quite different from the situation today. This livestock was raised for home consumption and, in the case of horses, mules, and occasionally oxen, traction. Pigs and chickens were fed farm and household wastes. Many farm families also sold livestock or livestock-derived...

read more

8 Country Stores and Huckster Trucks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-190

Farm families of this era often stressed that they produced much of what they consumed in terms of food and supplies and therefore bought very little, but there were limits to their self-sufficiency. The relatively few things they did purchase were important. The short list included salt, matches, coffee, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and kerosene, and there was no doubt a long list of hardware items and...

read more

9 Poke, Blackberries, and Hush Puppies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-202

It is easy to overlook the role that wild food played in the foodways of rural Kentucky. Many families supplemented their farm-grown food by hunting game, fishing, and gathering wild plants. The foods acquired this way were used to provide variety in the diet, and people enjoyed the recreation. In some cases, families also sold these foods....

read more

10 Puttin' Up the Garden

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-220

Families invested a lot of time in preserving the food raised in the garden. The range of techniques used was large and included drying, canning, curing, burying, cellaring, and pickling. Starting in the late 1940s these methods were supplemented with freezing. Such practices allowed the relative abundance of the growing and harvesting seasons to be spread over the year. Slowly, home-preserved products...

read more

11 Doin' the Hog Work

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-238

Many households raised hogs for home consumption, and discussions of foodways usually included references to the raising, slaughtering, processing, cooking, and eating of hogs. Besides being important sources of food, hogs also supplied fat for frying, baking, and soap making. This all changed with the economic transformation of Kentucky farms. These days, few pigs are raised for home consumption....

read more

12 Kentucky Foodways

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-246

Traditional Kentucky cuisine is the product of past necessity. The constituent foods and preparation practices fit the historical circumstances of rural Kentucky, and to some extent, people got used to and came to value that which circumstances demanded. Thus, foods born of necessity became valued and preferred. As rural life was transformed, the conditions that led to these ways of provisioning, cooking, and eating...

List of Narrators

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-250

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-254

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-260