Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-viii

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

To accomplish a project of this scope would have been impossible without the aid and encouragement of numerous people. First of all, I wish to thank John Booty, the historiographer of the Episcopal Church, and Arthur Walmsley, the retired bishop of Connecticut, for asking me to undertake the research that has led to this book. The initial stages of my work were supported by a sizable grant, presented to Arthur on the occasion of his...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

Ulrich B. Phillips, born in Georgia in 1877, is generally regarded as the preeminent southern historian of his generation. Raised in an environment that revered the values of the slaveholding class, Phillips's greatest contribution to scholarship was his argument that the plantation system represented the key to understanding the antebellum South. The plantation, he maintained, functioned both as an economic...

Part I: Segregation

read more

1. Racial Paternalism and Christian Mission after the Civil War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-30

As W.E.B. Du Bois observed in his path-breaking history of the Reconstruction era, news of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation evoked exuberant expressions of religious feeling among African Americans in the South. Beginning on January 1, 1863, Union army camps became both bases of military operations and havens for thousands of jubilant runaways. Du Bois wrote: "To most of the four million...

read more

2. Negro Work and the Decline of the Jim Crow Church

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-56

In The Negro's Church (1933), African American scholars Benjamin Mays and Joseph Nicholson collaborated on one of the most influential studies ever published on black religious institutions. The authors, who were ministers in the Northern Baptist and Colored Methodist Episcopal denominations, respectively, spent over a year collecting data on nearly eight hundred urban and rural churches throughout the United States. Despite the importance of the statistical information they...

Part II: Integration

read more

3. The Impact of the Brown Decision

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-86

J Waties Waring, a federal district court judge in South Carolina, seemed an unlikely person to become involved in the desegregation of public schools in the South in the 1950s. Raised and educated in Charleston, Waring embodied the aristocratic pretensions and conservative social values of the Carolina lowcountry. The descendent of slaveholders, he had been nursed during childhood by a black woman owned by his grandparents ...

read more

4. Theology, Social Activism, and the Founding of ESCRU

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 87-108

Do white church members in the South owe their primary allegiance to Jesus Christ or to jim Crow? This question, posed by Episcopal priest Das Kelley Barnett of Texas, became the focus for discussion at an ecumenical gathering of four hundred clerical and lay leaders in Nashville in April1957-the first major interracial and interdenominational assembly in the South since the release of the...

read more

5. The Church's Response to the Civil Rights Crisis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-134

In the spring of 1961, James Farmer, the director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), announced that his organization would send an integrated team of "freedom riders" on buses from Washington, D.C., to New Orleans. This action coincided with the seventh anniversary of the Brown decision and was intended to test the South's compliance with court-mandated desegregation in interstate transportation...

read more

6. Christian Witness and Racial Integration in the Deep South

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-160

At the end of 1961, Martin Luther King and the SCLC leadership took command of a crucial civil rights campaign in Albany, Georgia. Believing that only mass demonstrations and pressure from outside groups would win concessions from the white power structure in that town, King enlisted support from various allies throughout the country. John Morris was one of many white clergymen who responded to ...

Part III: Fragmentation

read more

7. Black Power and the Urban Crisis in the North

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-186

Although the passage of legislation in both 1964 and 1965 had represented a tremendous advance for black people nationwide, most African Americans still had a long way to go before they experienced appreciable change in their day-to-day lives. Despite receiving the guarantee of a few basic political rights, black people did not yet enjoy economic and social equality with whites; better schools, housing, and...

read more

8. Backlash and the End of the Civil Rights Era

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-214

In a speech before the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice in August 1969, Lucius Walker, a black minister and the director of the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization (IFCO), lambasted all major religious bodies in the United States for failing to support the revolution taking place outside the doors of their sanctuaries. Recently, "some churches and synagogues have been in the...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-218

In November 1990 a slim majority of voters in the state of Arizona defeated a referendum that would have created a holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Although white citizens in Arizona insisted that their vote was not intended as a repudiation of either King or the movement he led, the symbolic rejection of the great civil rights leader was troubling to many Americans. As a result a number of groups stepped...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-284

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-298

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 299-314