Cover

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Sponsor's page, Title page, Copyright, Quotation

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

The following pages are concerned with the citizen soldiery of Kentucky from the Indian wars to the formation of the National Guard. Originally the militia included every adult male who happened to live in what was then the westernmost...

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1. Virginia's Western Sword

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pp. 1-11

The militia of Kentucky not only preceded the formation of the commonwealth, but was the midwife at its birth. The state could never have been created without its citizensoldiers. Kentucky's first militiamen were hunters and farmers...

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2. Citizen-Soldiers of Kentucky

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pp. 12-21

On 1 November 1780 Kentucky County was divided into Fayette, Jefferson, and Lincoln counties. Virginia land enactments in 1777 and 1779 had given Kentucky settlers stronger land titles and more favorable preemption rights than previously...

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3. Decision at Fallen Timbers

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pp. 22-30

Large-scale Indian attacks on Kentucky ceased with the 1783 peace settlement with England, but nuisance raids and worse kept up even after statehood in 1792. Until the mid-1790s the British hung on to Detroit and other posts in defiance...

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4. Army of the Commonwealth

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pp. 31-39

The United States had passed a symbolic point in its military history. Wayne's legion proved to be the foundation stone of the minuscule professional army which was to bear the brunt of the nation's Indian wars over the next 96 years...

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5. From Tippecanoe to New Orleans

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pp. 40-51

Apart from the northwestern Indians, early Kentucky's most urgent concerns were navigation on the Mississippi River and deposit rights at New Orleans. Both President Washington and Governor Shelby were fearful in 1793 that George...

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6. "Corn Stalk Militia" to the Rear

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pp. 52-60

From 1815 through midcentury two themes characterized the evolution of all state militias: the decline into final oblivion of the universal-enrollment (or "common" or "ordinary") militia system and the concurrent emergence of companies of volunteers...

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7. Inflamed Borderland

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pp. 61-78

Although Kentucky society in the 1850s enjoyed comparative freedom from social lesions, national politics tended in an ominous direction. And in October 1859 John Brown's abortive plot to touch off a slave rebellion at Harper's Ferry...

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8. Violent Decades

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pp. 79-98

Within three years the Kentucky militia managed at long last to turn the corner in the direction toward which J. M. Wright was pointing. Never again was the State Guard to be so close to extinction as it seemed to the adjutant general in early...

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9. Nationalizing a Citizens' Army

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pp. 99-116

As an organization the Kentucky militia traveled a long way from 1878, when the State Guard was reorganized, to 1912, when it became the Kentucky National Guard. In 1880 Governor Blackburn declared that the commonwealth had...

A Note to Readers

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pp. 117-127