Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

We want to express our gratitude to the following four Indiana University grant programs or offices for their generous support of the workshop that launched this book: New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities, College Arts and Humanities Institute, Office of the Vice President for...

read more

Introduction: The Genesis and Themes of Everyday Life in Russia Past and Present

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

This volume originated from a series of interlinked and parallel conversations among the editors. These discussions explored new possibilities for transnational collaboration and developments in critical theory on the nature of the quotidian. Our initial deliberations led...

Part I: Approaches to Everyday Life

read more

1. The Scholarship of Everyday Life

David L. Ransel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-34

Since the fall of the Soviet Union historians in Russia and in the West have enthusiastically taken up the study of everyday life in Russian history and related fields. This trend in the two scholarly communities is not so much a convergence, although that too is gradually occurring, as a...

read more

2. Provincial Nobles, Elite History, and the Imagination of Everyday Life

Mary Cavender

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-51

What was “everyday life” in the country for Russian nobles? In Anna Karenina, the wealthy landowner Levin finds himself annoyed by his brother Koznyshev’s attitude:
Sergius Ivanich Koznyshev, wishing to take a rest from mental work, went to stay with his brother in the country instead of going abroad as usual...

read more

3. Resisting Resistance: Everyday Life, Practical Competence, and Neoliberal Rhetoric in Postsocialist Russia

Olga Shevchenko

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-71

The notion of “everyday life” seems to hold an instantaneous, almost intuitive, appeal for ethnographically inclined observers whose interest in lived experience thrives in the investigation of quotidian details. I share this fascination with the “everyday,” but I must start...

read more

4. The Oil Company and the Crafts Fair: From Povsednevnost′ to Byt in Postsocialist Russia

Douglas Rogers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-94

The 2009 “Obva: Soul of the Riverlands” festival, celebrated in recent years by four rural districts clustered around the Obva River in the Russian Perm Region, was coming to a close. By all accounts, it had been a success. The weather was glorious. Folklore ensembles had proudly...

Part II: Public Identities and Public Space

read more

5. “We Don’t Talk about Ourselves”: Women Academics Recall Their Path to Success

Natalia Pushkareva

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-117

The study of professionals, including academics, is a new branch of cultural anthropology. It lies at the intersection of ethnology and qualitative sociology, with its in-depth interviews, participant observation, and case studies. Although the application of the term “ethnology”...

read more

6. The Literature of Everyday Life and Popular Representations of Motherhood in Brezhnev’s Time

Elizabeth Skomp

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 118-139

In the mid-1960s Russian women writers began to articulate the contemporary experience of motherhood and thus to aspire to “that frequently stated goal of feminist study: seeing maternal points of view more fully, hearing maternal voices more clearly and variously, understanding...

read more

7. “They Are Taking That Air from Us”: Sale of Commonly Enjoyed Properties to Private Developers

David L. Ransel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 140-160

The concepts of public and private were not well developed in Soviet times because ownership of property belonged in principle to the people and was managed on their behalf by the state administration. Marx and Engels wrote in The Communist Manifesto that the theory of...

Part III. Living Space and Personal Choice

read more

8. Everyday Life and the Problem of Conceptualizing Public and Private during the Khrushchev Era

Deborah A. Field

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-180

Scholars often use spatial metaphors to explain public and private. We describe these aspects of life as spheres or realms or, in Habermas’s classic work, as linked rectangles.¹ However, such spatial images can collapse when we apply them to everyday life under Khrushchev; examining...

read more

9. Soviet Mass Housing and the Communist Way of Life

Steven E. Harris

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-202

In the 1950s and 1960s Nikita Khrushchev initiated a mass housing program that allowed millions of Soviet citizens to move from the overcrowded communal apartments, barracks, and dormitories of the Stalin era to single-family, separate apartments. Mass housing became...

read more

10. Everyday Aesthetics in the Khrushchev-Era Standard Apartment

Susan E. Reid

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-233

The domestic and everyday, constituting the “private sphere,” are commonly regarded as “the part of life you have most control over” and the least susceptible to ideological impositions.¹ The production of the domestic interior has been treated in a range of disciplines as an exercise...

read more

11. The Post-Soviet Kommunalka: Continuity and Difference?

Ilya Utekhin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 234-252

Communal apartments (kommunalki, sing. kommunalka), which were emblematic of the Soviet way of life, are no longer a common urban experience in contemporary Russia. Even though these housing arrangements still exist both in the prestigious central areas and in the...

Part IV. Myth, Memory, and the History of Everyday Life

read more

12. Everyday Stalinism in Transition-Era Film

Peter C. Pozefsky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-278

In a 1997 roundtable chaired by Liubov Arkus, editor of the film journal SEANS, several of Russia’s leading critics examined the body of late Soviet and post-Soviet films on the history of Stalinism. While the participants expressed a variety of opinions regarding the artistic merits...

read more

13. Totality Decomposed: Objectalizing Late Socialism in Post-Soviet Biochronicles

Serguei Oushakine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-310

In his short essay “The Stage Set of the Epoch,” Boris Eikhenbaum, a Russian formalist, explained the ubiquity of nonfiction literature in early Soviet Russia by suggesting that the material of postrevolutionary daily life (byt) was still too one-dimensional to be used as the content...

read more

14. Everyday Life and the Ties That Bind in Liudmila Ulitskaia’s Medea and Her Children

Benjamin Sutcliffe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-326

“It is a wonderful feeling, belonging to Medea’s family, a family so large that you can’t know all its members by sight, and they merge into a vista of things that happened, things that didn’t, and things that are yet to come.”¹ This utopian vision of kinship concludes the novel...

Part V. Coming Home: Transnational Connections

read more

15. Sino-Soviet Every Day: Chinese Revolutionaries in Moscow Military Schools, 1927–1930

Elizabeth McGuire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 329-349

One evening in the middle of January 1928, ninety-four Chinese students rushed headlong through downtown Moscow from the school where they were receiving military training to the headquarters of the Communist International, the governing body of global revolution...

read more

16. Coming Home Soviet Style: The Reintegration of Afghan Veterans into Soviet Everyday Life

Karen Petrone

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 350-367

On August 22, 1990, Komsomol′skaia pravda reported that Afghan veteran V. Shumkov “waited for an apartment, but one was not assigned to him.” Given the perennial shortage of housing in the Soviet Union, this situation was quite typical, but Shumkov’s reaction to his...

read more

17. Everyday Life in Transnational Perspective: Consumption and Consumerism, 1917–1939

Choi Chatterjee

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 368-389

Following the revolution of 1917, a sizable community of intrepid Americans, both male and female, traveled to the Soviet Union to report on the birth of a newly emerging civilization. There was an historical reason for this interest, as in the preceding decades scores of writers...

read more

Afterword

Sheila Fitzpatrick

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 390-406

Byt (everyday life) is a “swamp,” according to one contemporary Russian view, keeping people busy in “a set of ossified daily routines” that fail to provide meaning to life.¹ It was this byt that wrecked the poet Mayakovsky, or so he claimed in a farewell poem when he killed...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 407-414

List of Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 415-420

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 421-430