Cover

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Title page, Editorial series, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. ix-xxii

Just after midnight, a fleet of twenty-four ships slid east on the calm black water of the Devil’s Belt. It was late summer in 1781, and the fleet had waited until complete darkness to weigh anchor and move...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xxiii

I must first express my appreciation for Marian O’Keefe, local historian of Norwich, with whom I discussed the original idea for this book and who gave me help with sources on Benedict Arnold...

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On the Edge of Spring

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pp. 1-13

From the small town green of Norwich, Connecticut, paths ran in many directions. But when Benedict Arnold was born in January 1741, deep, suffocating snow snuffed all travel, shutting down...

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Flashpoint

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pp. 14-27

Benedict Arnold’s store on Leather Lane stood opposite the whipping post and town scales, where occasionally a slaver would auction his wares. But Arnold did not sell slaves in New Haven...

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Resist Even Unto Blood

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pp. 28-45

Benedict Arnold and his New Haven militia got as far as Massachusetts before they ran into a Connecticut patriot named Samuel Parsons. A member of the General Assembly, Parsons had ridden...

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The Shadow War

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pp. 46-61

George Washington needed information. No one could run a war without it, and now that the British had occupied Long Island, he needed to know what their next move was. He wrote to his...

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Invasion

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pp. 62-78

After partial succ ess stopping the British on Lake Champlain in the autumn of 1776, Benedict Arnold returned to Ticonderoga, where his friend Richard Varick called Arnold’s escape...

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Villainous Perfidy

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pp. 79-96

On Friday, June 19, 1778, Arnold’s coach rumbled down Market Street into Philadelphia accompanied by a regiment of Massachusetts militia. Like New Haven, Philadelphia was a planned city...

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The Scandal of the Age

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pp. 97-112

The continent buzzed with the news. When it reached Norwich, the angry townspeople gathered at the cemetery near Samuel Huntington’s house and furiously smashed the graves of...

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A Parricide in Old Virginia

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pp. 113-126

On Christmas Eve 1780 a northwest storm battered Arnold’s small fleet as it made its way south from New York. One ship almost sank, and another had to throw forty horses overboard to prevent...

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William Ledyard’s Last Summer

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pp. 127-139

William Ledyard was luckier than many during the Revolution, serving in a place where he could go home and see his wife, Anne, and their eight children almost every night. But they still didn’t...

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The Sixth of September

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pp. 140-150

The streets of New London pulsed with fear. Men loaded their muskets and flintlocks, rushing this way and that, leaderless. Pale-faced women dragged bags and pillowcases full of valuables...

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The Battle of Groton Heights

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pp. 151-161

While Benedict Arnold burned New London, Lt. Col. Edmund Eyre and a strong force of British regulars landed on the east side of the bay and headed toward Groton Heights. Eyre had the Fortieth...

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Remember New London

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pp. 162-177

Nathaniel Shaw returned the evening of September 6 to scenes of horror. Women stumbled around by candlelight, trying to identify their sons and husbands among the bodies piled under a huge...

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The Fall of Silas Deane

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pp. 178-196

While Benedict Arnold betrayed and attacked his homeland throughout 1780 and 1781, Silas Deane had returned to Europe to try to regain his lost reputation, along with the financial files that Congress...

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Epilogue

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pp. 197-204

In March 1794 the infamous French political impresario, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord, was kicked out of England after fleeing Paris during the height of the Terror. He decided to travel...

A Note on Sources

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pp. 205-206

Notes

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pp. 207-254

Index

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pp. 255-264

About the Author

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pp. 265-266