Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Editorial series, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

At long last, I am honored to sit down and thank those who helped breathe life into this book. I suspect that anyone who reads such monographs will understand that the research, writing, and revision process is a long one...

read more

Introduction: Enemies and Americans

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

“We are ready to forgive,” Union veteran W. T. Collins affirmed in the nation’s capital in 1869—only a few years after the smoke from America’s Civil War battlefields had cleared. “But we will never consent to public national tribute to obliterate the wide gulf which lies between principles for...

read more

Chapter One: The Memories of Those Days

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-41

A massive demobilization of military forces followed quickly on the heels of Union victory. After four years of bloody war, citizen soldiers of the United States resumed work on their farms and in their factories, shops, and firms across the reunited nation. For Federals, an army that had once boasted...

read more

Chapter Two: “The Greatest Conspiracy of All Times”: Union Veterans Commemorate the Suppression of Treason

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-65

Nothing stirred the hearts of Union veterans more than their memories of southern treason. Despite undeterred commitment to national unity, they generally shared the notion that Confederate soldiers, politicians, and even civilians who supported secession and the Confederate cause had committed...

read more

Chapter Three: Unrepentant Rebels: Commemorations and Confederate Reconciliation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-89

For Confederate veterans such as Thomas Neville Waul, postwar commemorations served as reminders of disunion. Waul, like many of his contemporaries, was intent on “fighting his battles o’er again.” At an early 1880s tribute to Hood’s Texas Brigade in Austin, Texas, he reminded...

read more

Chapter Four: The Enduring Work of the Republic: Commemorating Freedom in the Era of Reconciliation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-113

On July 1, 1889, New York veteran Charles A. Fuller linked succinctly the commemorative themes of union and emancipation. “Never forget,” he noted before a gathering of veterans on the Gettysburg battlefield, “that we fought for Freedom and Union, and they for Slavery and Disunion...

read more

Chapter Five: Calumny Masquerading as History: Rebels’ Response to the Emancipationist Cause

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 114-138

Confronting the issue of slavery within the context of a national commemorative ethos was an unsettling problem for former Confederates. Most set out to paint a noble picture of the Confederate States of America despite the existence of slavery within its borders. With sweeping strokes...

read more

Epilogue: Legacies under Pressure

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-144

One of the most heated displays of animosity reminiscent of veterans’ commemorative cultures took place in April 2003. That spring, a statue of Abraham Lincoln and his son Tad was unveiled on the grounds of the old Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, Virginia. The idea of Lincoln...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-184

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-212

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-220