Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-2

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Introduction

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pp. 3-46

The Mississippi Freedom Schools changed lives. They opened doors for students, creating exciting new possibilities for thousands of young black Mississippians who attended them during the summer of 1964. Those eager young pupils, longing for equality...

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Benton County Freedom Train

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pp. 47-56

Benton County is a quiet and rural area of northern Mississippi. Although it was not known as a hotbed of civil rights activism, local African Americans participated in the NAACP and the Citizen’s League, a small clandestine group of men that attempted to register and organize...

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Drew Freedom Fighter

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pp. 57-61

Located in Sunflower County and just across the border from Bolivar County, Drew Freedom School had students who came of age in one of the busiest movement centers in the state. Legendary African American activists such as Fannie Lou Hamer and Amzie Moore lived within a dozen...

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The Freedom Carrier (Greenwood, MS)

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pp. 62-67

The Greenwood movement began in earnest during the summer of 1962 when Cleveland, Mississippi, native Sam Block began organizing the local black community, knocking on doors and trying to recruit African American residents to attend mass meetings. Slowly but surely...

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Hattiesburg Freedom Press

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pp. 68-76

The Hattiesburg Freedom Press was produced by students in the Mt. Zion Freedom School of Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Mt. Zion was one of five Freedom Schools that met in Hattiesburg, the town that Freedom School coordinator Staughton Lynd dubbed “the Mecca of the Freedom School world...

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Student Voice of True Light (Hattiesburg, MS)

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pp. 77-110

The Student Voice of True Light was produced by the Freedom School students attending classes at the True Light Baptist Church located in the heart of Hattiesburg’s historic black community the Mobile Street District. Originally organized in 1903, True Light Baptist had for years...

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The Freedom News (Holly Springs, MS)

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pp. 111-123

Published during the first full week of Freedom School classes, The Freedom News from Holly Springs was one of the first Freedom School newspapers produced during Freedom Summer. The vibrant Holly Springs Freedom School met in two small houses located just across the campus...

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Freedom’s Journal (McComb, MS)

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pp. 124-162

With the help of local activists including NAACP members C. C. Bryant and E. W. Steptoe, McComb was one of the first places where SNCC gained a foothold. The McComb Freedom’s Journal helps demonstrate the importance of African American history to the Freedom School...

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Freedom Star (Meridian, MS)

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pp. 163-179

The Freedom Star was published by students attending the Meridian Freedom School. Although Hattiesburg was known as the “Mecca of the Freedom School world,” Meridian actually had the largest single Freedom School, regularly drawing over two hundred students per day...

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Freedom News (Palmer’s Crossing, MS)

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pp. 180-193

Students attending Freedom Schools held in the Priest’s Creek Missionary Baptist Church and St. John’s Methodist Church of Palmer’s Crossing banded together to produce the Freedom News. A small community located just outside of Hattiesburg, Palmer’s Crossing was home to...

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Ruleville Freedom Fighter

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pp. 194-207

Like their nearby counterparts in Drew, Ruleville Freedom School students attended classes in a hotbed of movement activity. Ruleville’s project director was Charles McLaurin, the SNCC organizer who was jailed in Drew. The town was also home to the powerful white supremacist...

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Freedom Flame (Shaw, MS)

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pp. 208-210

On July 19, 1964, the New York Times ran a story that infuriated African Americans across Mississippi. Among a number of racist and inaccurate statements taken from white civic leaders living near Shaw was a statement from a Cleveland, Mississippi, sheriff who claimed that “95...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 211-212

As with the Freedom Schools themselves, this book was a community effort only made possible through the contributions of a wide range of activists, archivists, and historians. Numerous Freedom School students, teachers, and organizers helped teach...

Notes

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pp. 213-222

Index

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pp. 223-228