Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

A book like this is the product of hard work, of many conversations with, and much encouragement from mentors, colleagues, peers, friends, and family. And so I owe a debt of gratitude to many people, not all of whose contribution I can fully acknowledge here. I am especially...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-30

Over the last decade critics of postcolonial and diaspora1 literatures have paid increasing attention to the use of metaphors of food, eating, digestion, and related tropes by women writers across national boundaries to frame and critique continuing relations of domination and...

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1. Cannibal Love: Ideologies of Power, Gender, and the Erotics of Eating

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pp. 31-76

This chapter engages with acts of gastronomic consumption and sexual incorporation as two prototypes of the “othering” rhetoric in (neo)colonial discourse that reach their apotheosis in the figure of the cannibal. Specifically, I read Maryse Condé’s...

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2. Immigration, Assimilation, and Conflict: A Dialectics of Cannibalism and Anthropemy

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pp. 77-120

This chapter explores the dialectic of cannibalism and anthropemy (from Greek emein, to vomit) that functions in the larger context of assimilation and social integration in the works of Edwidge Danticat, Andrea Levy, and Gisèle Pineau. That is, I explore the ways in which countries...

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3. Dis(h)coursing Hunger: In the Throes of Voracious Capitalist Excesses

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pp. 121-158

This chapter examines the use of the trope of hunger in Lindsey Collen’s There is a Tide (1990) and Mutiny (2001) to dispel the myth of Mauritius as a model of paradise that permeates historical, travel, and literary writing. Best captured by Bernadin de Saint-Pierre in his eighteenth...

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4. Edible Écriture: Feuding Words, Fighting Foods

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pp. 159-198

In this chapter I link the themes of cannibals, pirates, and colonial conquest of islands to the consumption of literary texts as a commodity embedded within paradigms of domination and control. Undoubtedly, the literary trope of the desert island, with its concomitant...

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Epilogue

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pp. 199-202

In Carnal Appetites: Foodsexidentities, Elspeth Probyn makes the noteworthy assertion that “the figure of the cannibal has returned to haunt Western societies, from which, of course, it originally came” (9). Probyn is referring here to the growing increase in the different scenarios...

Notes

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pp. 203-216

Bibliography

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pp. 217-232

Index

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pp. 233-242

About the Author. Production Notes

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