Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vi-ix

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Preface

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pp. ix-x

"When a war poses for its picture . . . it will sit with hands folded for those who wish it to, or it will strut with clanking sword, or pose as a mother of mercy, or the invading barbarian, or the valiant hero, or the cringing coward, or, better yet, a composite of all of these enveloped in a fury of sound and sight and horror."1 With these words, Jules ("Jay") Andre Smith, one of eight official artists of the...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Numerous people have come to my aid in the preparation of this study. The Graduate School of the University of Northern Colorado, through its faculty assistance program, has made funds available to purchase many of the photographs used in the book and to help defray some travel expenses. Also at UNC, Lucy Schweers, and the staff in the Interlibrary Loan Office, have been unfailingly helpful to me in the long search for books and articles which they supplied in a virtually unending stream....

Part I: Art and the Great War

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1. Introduction

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pp. 3-10

'Art and war are old companions" one art historian has asserted, further observing that "battlefields and soldiers have been popular subjects with artists since earliest times"1 And so they have. The reasons are. not hard to find. Although war has its uncounted tragedies and late in the twentieth century confronts humanity with cataclysmic dangers, fields of battle are charged with action, color, and dynamism ...

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2. The Army's Official Artists

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pp. 11-24

The first suggestion for the appointment of official artists by the U.S. government for special service with the American Expeditionary Forces, then assembling in Europe, was apparently made by Kendall Banning in July of 1917.1 Banning, in charge of photographs and films for the Division of Films under Creel's Committee on Public Information, consulted with representatives of Great Britain and France,...

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3. The Daily Travail

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pp. 25-41

Although the earlier careers of the artists reflected diversity they were soon to have common experiences in abundance. One was the pleasure and excitement of being commissioned and given an opportunity to serve their country in a way compatible with their skills. Peixotto recalled that when offered his captaincy in ...

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4. After the Armistice

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pp. 42-56

Aylward's endeavors in France during the months before the end of the war were similar to those of the others. After the Armistice, he was with the occupation forces that marched through Luxembourg into Germany Remaining for only a short time on the Rhine, Aylward, like the other artists, desired to relocate in Paris, and he engaged a studio apartment at No. 5 Schoelcher for three months, beginning...

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5. The Fruits of Their Labor

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pp. 57-68

Although the U.S. Army did not discharge all of the artists at the same time, the general policy was to expedite their removal from the service. The work that the artists managed to complete before becoming civilians would be transmitted to the War Department. Other works, sketches, and field notes yet to be completed could later be purchased by the War Department, if it so desired, or would remain the property of the artists.1 The results produced a mixed legacy. Some artwork...

Part II: The Artists' Images

A. William fames Aylward

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pp. 70-76

B. Walter Jack Duncan

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pp. 77-82

C. Harvey Thomas Dunn

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pp. 83-94

D. George Matthews Harding

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pp. 95-103

E. Wallace Morgan

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pp. 104-110

F. Ernest Clifford Peixotto

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pp. 111-118

G. J. André Smith

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pp. 119-125

H. Hairy Everett Townsend

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pp. 126-135

Notes

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pp. 136-152

Index

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pp. 153-159

Back Cover

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pp. 160-160