Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I am indebted to many individuals and institutions who helped me over the years I have been working on this book. First and perhaps foremost is David R. Marples at the University of Alberta, who saw this project through its initial stage. I have benefited greatly from his insightful...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

Belarus is a country that sometimes puzzles outside observers. For much of its existence as an independent state, Belarus has developed quite differently from most of its neighbors. It is a country in which a majority regards Belarusian as its native language but only a relatively...

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1. Imagining Belarus

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pp. 13-31

The manufacturing of a Belarusian consciousness took place within a context of the ideological historicizing of the past, a deliberate attempt by Belarusian intellectuals to break the Russocentric approach of the tsarist historiography of Vasilii Kliuchevskii (1841–1911), Pavel Miliukov...

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2. The Beginnings of Belarusian Nationalism

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pp. 32-65

Modern nationalism arrived late to Belarus. A multilingual and ethnically diverse corner of Europe, lacking clear geographic boundaries in the historical borderlands between Poland and Russia, Belarus has been influenced by both Russian and Polish cultural traditions. The modern...

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3. Six Declarations of Statehood in Three Years: Origins of a New National Mythology

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pp. 66-122

The chaotic period of 1917–1920 encompassed revolutions and collapses of the Russian and German empires, the reemergence of Poland, the dramatic conclusion of World War I, the Russian Civil War, and the Polish–Soviet War. All these events directly affected the Belarusian lands...

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4. Nationalities Policy in Soviet Belarus: Affirmative Action, Belarusization, and Korenizatsiia

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pp. 123-163

The reestablishment of the SSRB in 1920 was accompanied by nation-building policies, aimed at shoring up support for Soviet rule. The division of Belarus between Poland and the Soviets as a result of the Riga treaty was a serious setback to the Belarusian nationalists, who had...

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5. Belarusian Nationalism in the Second Polish Republic

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pp. 164-208

The peace treaties that concluded World War I failed to resolve the national question for several peoples in Eastern Europe. The principles of national self-determination, articulated in Wilson’s famous Fourteen Points, were implemented unevenly. Sizable German and Magyar minorities...

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6. Opposition to Belarusization

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pp. 209-242

In her study on Soviet ethnography and the construction of Soviet nationalities policy, Francine Hirsch shows that “the Soviet regime would use ethnographic data to impose nationhood on people who either ‘hid’ or did not know their ‘true’ nationality.”1 Since Soviet authorities interpreted...

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Chapter 7. The Suppression of Belarusian Nationalism in the Second Polish Republic, 1927–1930

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pp. 243-274

During the first half of the 1920s the Polish government was hostile to the aspirations of the Belarusian nationalists. Perceiving Belarusian nationalism as an irredentist threat to the state, strong forces within the ruling circles of the Grabski government wanted to suppress it. However...

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Chapter 8. Soviet Repression in the BSSR: The Destruction of Belarusian National Communism

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pp. 275-303

If the 1925 Concordat with the Vatican and Piłsudski’s coup of 1926 were important events in the process of suppressing Belarusian nationalism in the Second Polish Republic, the so-called War Scare in the spring of 1927 marked a similar turning point in the BSSR. The Stalinist reorganization...

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Conclusion

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pp. 304-318

In his 1922 tragicomic play Tuteishyia, Ianka Kupala, the most celebrated Belarusian writer, describes the arrival of two ethnographic specialists to the Belarusian lands. One is a Polish-speaking scholar from the West, the other is a Russian-speaking colleague from the East. The ethnographers...

Notes

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pp. 319-396

Works Cited

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pp. 397-424

Index

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pp. 425-436

Back Cover

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