Cover

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Title page, Editorial series, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction. A Theory of Economic Segregation and Civic Engagement

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pp. 1-26

An African American middle and upper-middle class emerged in Atlanta in the early twentieth century, and aft er World War II these families increasingly sought homes away from the impoverished, decaying, and densely populated urban core. Additionally, and despite great effort by segregationists...

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Chapter 1. Understanding Civic Engagement in Context: Methodology and the Logic of Case Study Selection

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pp. 27-55

Understanding whether levels of civic engagement may have changed over time as a result of trends in economic segregation is vital for deepening our understanding of citizen participation in American politics. We know a great deal about national trends in voter participation and civic engagement...

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Chapter 2. Public Policy and Civic Environments in Urban America

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pp. 56-109

The story of urban decline and attempted renewal in the United States has been told and retold, and the broad contours are well known. But the effect of urban development policies implemented in the mid- twentieth century needs further examination, especially the degree to which those policies...

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Chapter 3. Economic Segregation and the Mobilizing Capacity of Voluntary Associations

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pp. 110-141

During his visit to the United States in the 1830s, Alexis de Tocqueville famously noted that a defining feature of the American character was an enthusiasm for joining together in groups, from town-hall meetings and procedures of direct democracy to church communities working to address...

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Chapter 4. Economic Segregation, Political Parties, and Political Mobilization

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pp. 142-184

Citizens learn and practice some of the important building blocks for political participation by way of their involvement with voluntary associations, and residential segregation along economic lines diminishes the ability of community organizations to recruit and mobilize neighborhood residents in...

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Conclusion. The Dynamics and Implications of Economic Segregation, Civic Engagement, and Public Policy

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pp. 185-194

The findings offered in this book suggest that the commonly accepted notion that low-income citizens do not vote because of their individual economic status misses a significant point: low-income citizens are increasingly finding themselves living with other low- income citizens, which diminishes...

Appendix A. Vote-Counting Decisions in Atlanta, Kansas City, Milwaukee, and Rochester

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pp. 195-196

Appendix B. Interview Protocol and Schedule for Neighborhood Associations, Parent-Teacher Associations, and Churches

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pp. 197-203

Appendix C. Interview Protocol and Schedule for Elected Officials and Public Officials

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pp. 204-210

Notes

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pp. 211-248

Index

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pp. 249-252

Acknowledgments

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pp. 253-255