Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

List of Figures

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xx

This book argues for the continuity of a chief theoretical pathway from classic sociology to the present. Durkheim launched sociology on a high theoretical level by providing an explanation for some of the most central questions: what produces social membership, moral beliefs...

Acknowledgments

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p. xxi

Part I. Radical Microsociology

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1. The Program of Interaction Ritual Theory

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pp. 3-46

A theory of interaction ritual is the key to microsociology, and microsociology is the key to much that is larger. The smallscale, the here-and-now of face-to-face interaction, is the scene of action and the site of social actors. If we are going to find the agency of social life, it will...

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2. The Mutual-Focus / Emotional-Entrainment Model

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pp. 47-101

At the center of an interaction ritual is the process in which participants develop a mutual focus of attention and become entrained in each other’s bodily micro-rhythms and emotions. This chapter will present the details of this process in an explicit model of processes that...

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3. Emotional Energy and the Transient Emotions

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pp. 102-140

Emotion is a central ingredient and outcome of IRs. It is time now to examine emotions more closely. Among other benefits of doing so is to highlight the contribution that sociology of emotions makes to macrosociological theory. And we shall see, via a circuitous route, the emotion...

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4. Interaction Markets and Material Markets

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pp. 141-182

Individuals move through their everyday lives encountering other people with whom they carry out some degree of interaction ritual, ranging from the barest utilitarian encounters and failed rituals to intensely engaging ritual solidarity. Who each person will interact with...

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5. Internalized Symbols and the Social Process of Thinking

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pp. 183-220

In IR theory, thinking is the third-order circulation of symbols. It follows upon the first-order creation of symbols in intense IRs, and their second-order recirculation in conversational networks. Thinking is yet another loop, now into imaginary internal conversations, which are...

Part II. Applications Chapter

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6. A Theory of Sexual Interaction

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pp. 223-257

Is sex a natural biological drive or is it socially constructed? As sociologists, we are inclined to say it is the latter, constructed upon the basis of the former. But this very general, conventionally palatable answer leaves everything dangling. How strong and how constant is the...

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7. Situational Stratification

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pp. 258-296

Are received sociological theories capable of grasping the realities of contemporary stratification? We think in terms of a structured hierarchy of inequality. A prominent imagery is Bourdieu’s (1984) field of economic power and a hierarchy of cultural tastes internalized in individuals...

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8. Tobacco Ritual and Anti-Ritual: Substance Ingestion as a History of Social Boundaries

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pp. 297-344

Rituals mark boundaries of inclusion and exclusion. Such rituals at times are contested, by persons located in various relationships to those boundaries. At times the ritual itself is attacked, frequently by individuals or groups who do not recognize its ritual character; for...

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9. Individualism and Inwardness as Social Products

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pp. 345-374

In the perspective of IR chains, is there any place left for the individual? It might seem that the theory fails to do justice to individuals, and especially to their autonomy, idiosyncracy, and apartness. The modal character of IR theory seems to be a gregarious extrovert, always...

Notes

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pp. 375-416

References

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pp. 417-434

Index

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pp. 435-442