Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

Early in our Ph.D. programs, we met briefly at the XVIIIth International Congress of Entomology in Vancouver. At the time, both of us were studying the reproductive biology of water striders, so we kept in touch over the next few years. Remarkably, by the end of our degrees, we discovered we had independently come to the same conclusions about the mating system of these...

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1. Sexual Conflict in Nature

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pp. 1-13

During the mating season, male robber flies roam through the vegetation in search of females. When approached by a male, a female takes to the wing, and the male pursues. If overtaken and grappled by a male, females of most species struggle violently, often successfully, to free themselves. In a few species...

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2. Sexual Selection and Sexual Conflict: History, Theory, and Empirical Avenues

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pp. 14-43

Since Darwin (1871), at least, the notion of conflict between the sexes has been present in discussions of sexual selection, sexual dimorphism, and the sex roles. However, it was a century after Darwin before sexual conflict, and its potential to shape the sexes and their interactions, was fully recognized. As mentioned earlier...

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3. Sexual Conflict Prior to Mating

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pp. 44-91

In some species with sexual reproduction there is no direct interaction between individuals of each sex (e.g., some salamanders, most plants, and a variety of marine broadcast spawners). For these, the union of gametes does not require direct interactions between individual males and females. These species...

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4. Sexual Conflict after Mating

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pp. 92-155

Darwin’s (1871) definition of sexual selection (“the advantage which certain individuals have over other individuals . . . in exclusive relation to reproduction”) was not limited to processes occurring prior to pairing, but his subsequent discussion was. The literature on sexual selection has ever since been...

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5. Parental Care and Sexual Conflict

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pp. 156-178

In the two preceding chapters, we have argued that males and females often have conflicting interests over the initiation of mating, the interactions during mating, and the termination of mating. When either parent cares for eggs or offspring, with increased offspring fitness as a consequence, we refer to this...

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6. Other Implications of Sexual Conflict

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pp. 179-215

In chapters 3–5, we have discussed reproductive conflicts between the sexes based on whether they occur prior to, during, or after mating. However, there is also a range of topics that fall somewhat outside this classification scheme but are nevertheless highly relevant to this book. In this chapter, we will discuss...

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7. Concepts and Levels of Sexual Conflict

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pp. 216-225

Like most quickly growing fields, the study of sexual conflict is rich in debate over concepts, assumptions, and interpretation, and much of the debate revolves around terminology. One striking feature of this field is the diversity of scholars that have become interested in questions relating to sexual...

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8. Concluding Remarks

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pp. 226-228

The main aim of this book has been to build the case that we may need to revise the traditional view of coevolution between genes expressed in the two sexes and the consequences of this process for the differences we now see between the sexes. Reproduction in sexual species is rife with conflicts of...

References

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pp. 229-304

Author Index

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pp. 305-320

Subject Index

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pp. 321-330