Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

Creativity as Sacrifice has been on a long journey, and there are many people who have contributed to its completion. This book began as a PhD thesis at the University of St Andrews. I am eternally thankful for the opportunity to participate there in the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts. A thanks is due to...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiii

Contributors to contemporary discussions about human creativity tend to verge toward one of two extremes. On the one side are those who suppose that it is something that any of us can do quite easily at a single stroke, as it were, by simply picking up a paintbrush...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

The word creativity makes a late appearance in the English language.1 The modeling of human agency upon divine power, however, began at least during the fifteenth century.2 For example, a new vocabulary...

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What Is a Theological Model?

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pp. 15-40

How does one reflect theologically on the experience of human creativity? How does one reflect theologically on anything at all? We can define theological reflection very broadly as the human activity...

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Theological Models for Human Creativity in Twentieth-Century Theologies of Art

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pp. 41-72

Theological models are like tools composed of language because they perform a function. There are some who think the function of theological models for human creativity is peripheral or merely illustrative in a theology of art. I wish to show, to the contrary...

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The Work of Genius

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pp. 73-104

Today, we speak of a genius as a person who excels in any discipline. A genius is thought of as mastering an activity, such as musical composition, without the normal training required to do so. A genius seems to be endowed with an innate ability to perform much better...

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The Icon of God

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pp. 105-134

Over the next two chapters, we will explore two theological models for human creativity that insist upon an intrinsic connection between divine creativity and the incarnation. Even if there is an intrinsic connection between creation and incarnation, why should thinking...

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The Sacrificial Offering

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pp. 135-162

If the icon of God model focuses on creativity as an act of communication, the sacrificial offering model invites us to think more broadly. Rooted in the incarnation as a redemptive act, the sacrificial offering model provides greater scope to see the creative...

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The Anthropological Costs

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pp. 163-188

In chapter 1, I argued that one can assess a theological model by weighing two different costs: anthropological and theological. The theological cost refers to the way that the theological model organizes and draws upon the Bible and tradition. The anthropological cost...

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The Theological Costs

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pp. 189-224

Over the course of this project, the question of whether divine or human creativity needs its materials, traditions, and communities has emerged as a central theme. In chapter 3, I argued that the modern concept of genius encouraged a picture of the artist as one who does...

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Conclusion

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pp. 225-230

Contemporary American culture places a high value on creativity. In his popular book The Rise of the Creative Class,1 Richard Florida argues that the U. S. economy shifted in the last half of the twentieth century toward a creative economy. He points to evidence such as...

Works Cited

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pp. 231-254

Index

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pp. 255-260