Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Foreword

Mayor Martin J. Walsh

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pp. ix-x

Marathon Monday is always one of the most remarkable days in Boston and has been for more than 100 years. It’s a day when people from across the globe turn their eyes to our great city to watch the world’s elite runners compete in one of the most unique...

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[1] Patriots’ Day

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pp. 1-9

The cold ground trembled as the drumbeat of war echoed across Lexington Green, where thousands of spectators huddled together against the early morning chill. With their hands tucked into the lined pockets of...

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[2] Murder In Waltham

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pp. 10-18

As millions around the nation somberly observed the tenth anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on America, a Chechen immigrant named Tamerlan Tsarnaev stood inside the second-floor apartment at 12 Harding Avenue in Waltham, Massachusetts, a relatively quiet suburb just...

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[3] Easy Money

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pp. 19-27

Danny Keeler walked into his office at 650 Harrison Avenue at 7:30 a.m. He had a large hot coffee from Dunkin’ Donuts in his hand and a smile on his face. This was easy money day. Unlike members of the fire department, all Boston police officers are ordered to work on days like this when large...

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[4] Safe Haven

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pp. 28-35

For every hour Anzor Tsarnaev spent fixing beat-up cars in a cold, open space that had been donated to him by the owner of a Cambridge rug company, he spent another two at the nearby Somerville Boxing Gym molding his eldest son, Tamerlan, into a contender and amateur champion...

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[5] Joy on Boylston Street

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pp. 36-45

Denise and Bill Richard had a decision to make. How would they spend the crisp spring day with their three children, eleven-year-old Henry, eight-year-old Martin, and seven-year-old Jane? They were an outdoorsy couple who loved hiking and bike riding. Bill had once been a runner...

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[6] Dagestan

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pp. 46-53

By the early spring of 2012, Russia’s FSB (the successor of the KGB) already had information in its possession about the potential terrorist threat posed by Tamerlan Tsarnaev, thanks to a 2010 interrogation of a Canadian boxer named William Plotnikov. Plotnikov and Tsarnaev appeared to be...

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[7] Calm Before the Storm

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pp. 54-61

On a normal Marathon Monday, the city’s longest-serving mayor, Thomas M. Menino, would be at the finish line to crown the men’s winner. It was a duty he had performed for nineteen previous years and one that he looked forward to annually. The eyes of the sporting world are on Boston every...

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[8] Terror Strikes

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pp. 62-69

On the morning of April 15, Tamerlan Tsarnaev was clean shaven. Gone was the thick black beard he had grown while in Dagestan the year before. He put on a white V-neck T-shirt, tan pants, and a black baseball cap...

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[9] Fire at Forum

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pp. 70-81

While shocked onlookers were trying to make sense of what they had just seen and heard outside Marathon Sports, Bill Richard knew exactly what was happening. At first many believed they had witnessed a transformer...

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[10] Under Siege

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pp. 82-91

Danny Keeler had spent much of the early afternoon walking up and down Boylston Street popping in and out of various bars and restaurants, including Abe & Louie’s and McGreevy’s, to monitor crowd control...

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[11] Saving Lives

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pp. 92-104

Michelle L’Heureux was driven to Faulkner Hospital and rushed into the pre-operation unit in the emergency room, where she was given a morphine drip. The pain slipped away as X-rays were taken of her injuries. The doctors couldn’t believe she had no broken bones. They gave her a tetanus...

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[12] Taking Command

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pp. 105-117

Just as the explosions were being reported over radios and scanners at the police and fire departments, word spread of another emergency. The John F. Kennedy Library in Dorchester was on fire. The presidential library, a popular tourist spot right along Boston Harbor, was open that day, but...

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[13] Keeler's Ghosts

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pp. 118-128

In death, she was smiling. Krystle Campbell looked serene as she lay on a stretcher in the back room of the medical tent on Boylston Street. Danny Keeler didn’t know who she was as the young woman had no identification, driver’s license, or ATM card on her body. She did have black gunpowder...

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[14] A Family's Anguish

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pp. 129-134

Bill Richard was dying inside. His wife, Denise, was in surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center having her injured eye stabilized; his daughter, Jane, was being operated on at Boston Children’s Hospital a short distance away on Longwood Avenue; and his son Martin was still out there on the...

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[15] Citizen Soldiers

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pp. 135-151

Late Monday night, Kurt Schwartz suggested to Commissioner Davis, Mayor Menino, and the governor that three hundred soldiers from the Massachusetts National Guard be used to help secure the perimeter of what was now a twenty-block crime scene around Boylston Street...

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[16] The Flame is Kindled

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pp. 152-159

Air Force One touched down at Logan Airport early Thursday morning. Governor Patrick and his wife, Diane, met President Obama and the First Lady on the tarmac. The two old friends shook hands and embraced...

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[17] Traitors

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pp. 169-167

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev returned to UMass-Dartmouth just a few minutes after 4 p.m. on Thursday. The cloak of anonymity would shield him for another hour before the FBI released clear photos of him and his brother to the world. The FBI still did not have his name. He was only known as...

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[18] War in Watertown

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pp. 168-176

Watertown Police Officer Joe Reynolds was on routine patrol around 12:40 a.m. when he got the call that a stolen Mercedes was headed his way—Cambridge police had called Watertown, notifying them that there had been a carjacking around midnight...

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[19] The Lockdown

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pp. 177-197

Dic Donohue was clinging to life when he was rushed into Mount Auburn Hospital. Doctors would later say that he had barely a drop of blood left in him when he arrived. He had gone into cardiac arrest during the ambulance ride. As Tim Menton drove, his brother, Pat, and Watertown...

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[20] Captured

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pp. 198-211

Moments after the bombing suspect was taken into custody, Mayor Tom Menino got on the police radio. He was exhausted and overcome with emotion.
“Your mayor is very proud of you,” he told his men...

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[21] Sharing the Blame

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pp. 212-215

In early July 2013, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev made his first appearance in federal court, where he was arraigned on thirty charges stemming from the Boston Marathon bombings. Dressed in an orange prison jumpsuit and appearing sleepy-eyed and nonchalant, the nineteen-year-old terror suspect...

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[22] Field of Dreams

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pp. 216-228

One key decision made in the hours following the bombings was to establish a sanctioned, primary charity to benefit survivors and the families of the victims. Both Governor Patrick and Mayor Menino had seen the chaos and corruption that had ensued after 9/11 when a number of phony...

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[23] The Deserted Island

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pp. 229-240

The holidays were a particularly difficult time for the survivors, especially for the families whose loved ones were no longer here.
For the Collier family, a trip to Florida was planned. Thanksgiving had always been Sean’s favorite holiday, as it was an opportunity to bring all...

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[24] The New Normal

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pp. 241-245

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sits in isolation in a small prison cell at the Federal Medical Center in Devens, Massachusetts, forty miles from the finish line on Boylston Street. He is cut off from the outside world. Communicating with other prisoners is strictly forbidden. Sunlight is rare. His only visitors...

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[25] From Finish Line to Finish Line

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pp. 246-254

Jun Lu and his wife stood in front of Forum one year to the day after losing their daughter, Lingzi. Boylston Street was quiet. Jun Lu stared down at the sidewalk and must have wondered, as all parents would, whether his child had experienced pain as she was dying or whether the end had come...

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Author's Note

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pp. 255-256

As an author, you’re only as good as the stories you write, and the stories we learned about and included in our book will continue to inspire us for years to come. We spent a year working on this book and thousands of hours researching the details and facts surrounding the Boston Marathon...

Notes

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pp. 257-262

Illustrations

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