Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

In preparing this edition of Elder Northfield’s Home, I am indebted to two wonderful friends and mentors— Sharon M. Harris, whose efforts to recover the work of nineteenth- century women writers has reconfigured the academic discipline in...

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Editor’s Introduction

Nicole Tonkovich

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pp. ix-xliv

Although the novel you are about to read has not been in print for more than a century, in its day it was well received. A reviewer of Elder Northfield’s Home called it “a soul-disturbing story . . . with plenty of honest indignation and honest feeling...

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A Note on the Text

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pp. xlv-xlvi

A. Jennie Bartlett’s book, Elder Northfield’s Home; or, Sacrificed on the Mormon Altar. A Story of the Blighting Curse of Polygamy, was first published in 1882 by J. Howard Brown in New York...

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Preface

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pp. 1-4

Sad as the scenes depicted by the succeeding pages may seem, revolting though they appear to a right-minded community, savoring as they do of barbarism and superstition, and displaying...

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Chapter 1

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pp. 5-21

“Well, Marion, here we are!—trunks packed; farewell calls made; passages engaged; tears all shed;—wish I were sure of the last. O how hard I find it to leave my dear home and country...

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Chapter 2

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pp. 22-38

Th e voyage had been a tiresome one, as all voyages were in the days of slow sailing vessels, and now as they were nearing land, a general cheerfulness pervaded the whole ship. Anticipations...

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Chapter 3

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pp. 39-63

Emigration to the West in those days was not the easy matter it is to-day, for only a part of the journey could then be performed by rail. Instead of crossing the plains with the rapidity and comfort that the introduction of the great Pacific Railway...

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Chapter 4

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pp. 64-71

Marion embraced her first opportunity to call again on these ladies, whom she liked very much. She found only one of them at home, but did not regret this, for she felt much more free to converse with one alone; besides, this one was particularly attractive...

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Chapter 5

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pp. 72-88

Since her aunt had told her something of the early history of her friend, Elder Parker’s first wife, Marion wished to visit her for her aunt’s sake, and, if possible, be of some service or comfort...

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Chapter 6

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pp. 89-103

Marion saw so many children of all sizes playing about the streets at all hours of the day that she at last inquired why they were not at school and where the school buildings were. She had not seen one there. She was told that there were no...

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Chapter 7

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pp. 104-123

Peacefully, almost happily, at times, were the days of Marion’s life passing now, but her clear sky was darkening, a cloud was gathering, a storm was about to burst over her head and well-nigh overwhelm her. For a time, after the indignation brought...

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Chapter 8

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pp. 124-141

Marion had consented to the bringing of the second wife into her home, but she felt that she could not endure the painful ordeal that was expected of her. She grew almost frantic as she paced her chamber till the small hours of the night. She...

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Chapter 9

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pp. 142-153

Little Nell was sent to her mother’s sister, in a distant part of the Territory, and Elder Northfield’s second home was broken up. Now he had one home, one wife, one family to care for, and as time passed on he realized much more comfort than he had...

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Chapter 10

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pp. 154-171

Between Elder Northfield and his wife there seldom passed any words with reference to polygamy. Each felt that it was a painful subject to be avoided by them, as they could never agree upon it. Marion had no means of knowing whether her...

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Chapter 11

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pp. 172-192

Many hundred miles from the scenes portrayed by the preceding pages, in a house furnished with every luxury and comfort its inmates desired, sat an elderly lady reading stories to two little children, sitting at her feet, and eagerly listening to the...

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Chapter 12

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pp. 193-212

Since the completion of the railway, Edith, all unknown to any one, had harbored thoughts of leaving the Mormon world and attempting to seek a support for herself among the Gentiles. She felt now as some other women felt—that escape was not...

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Chapter 13

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pp. 213-227

Had Edith and Mayon succeeded in reaching their destination in time for the train, they would have undoubtedly been forced to accompany the husband and father back into Mormonism. But a kind and merciful Providence...

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Chapter 14

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pp. 228-243

At the close of Mayon’s second year at school Lillian graduated, and with honor, and Mayon knew that when she returned after vacation she must come alone. Therefore graduation day was rather a sad one to her. But Jessie’s parents had invited...

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Chapter 15

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pp. 244-263

Th us matters stood, when Mayon received a most unexpected visit. Her mother called her one day to meet a friend in the parlor. She entered the room and beheld a girl apparently about her own age, clad in a rather shabby dress and bonnet. Her face...

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Chapter 16

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pp. 264-279

At D—Seminary one room, at least, was in the most perfect order. Bouquets, in spite of the season, ornamented its little table, and filled it with sweetness. Jessie, with eager, expectant look, was attired in one of her most attractive costumes, and her...

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Chapter 17

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pp. 280-295

All this time, though Edith had been urgently invited to join the Bernards at their cottage by the sea, yet she remained with her country friends, and led a peaceful, happy life, forming a strong affection for the family and especially her little charges...

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Chapter 18

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pp. 296-310

After a few weeks Mayon received a letter from Jessie, containing an urgent request for a visit from her. As she had spent but very little time with them for a year, she accepted the invitation, and soon old scenes were revisited, old friendships...

Notes

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pp. 311-315