Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

The Hexagrams

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pp. xi-xvi

Chronology of Chinese Dynasties

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Preliminary Remarks and Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xxiv

The curse of China studies for Westerners has always been the transliteration of Chinese sounds. For many years the scholarly (and popular) convention was to use the so-called Wade-Giles system for rendering Chinese names, terms, and titles, which is why so many people in the West know the Classic of Changes as the I Ching.

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

For those who think of themselves as secular, rational, and scientific, the Yijing seems to be a work of “awesome obscurity,” full of unfamiliar symbols and cryptic sayings, and reflecting a worldview sometimes described as “mystical” or “prelogical.” And for those of a more religious disposition, the lack of a cosmology...

PART ONE: The Domestic Evolution of the Yijing

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pp. 15-18

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CHAPTER 1 Genesis of the Changes

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pp. 19-47

We often cannot say exactly when, where, or how ancient texts were born. Some of the reasons are obvious. The further away in time, the more likely a work’s origins will be obscure: memories fade, original materials disappear, alternative versions surface. Often, not least in the case of...

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CHAPTER 2 The Making of a Classic

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pp. 48-74

Without the Ten Wings, it is extremely unlikely that the basic text of the Changes would have become anything more than a technical divination manual, one of many such documents circulating in the late Warring States period. But as it turned out, this particular collection...

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CHAPTER 3 Interpreting the Changes

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pp. 75-124

Approaches to the Yijing—whether scholarly or divinatory— have naturally hinged on factors such as philosophical or religious affiliations, intellectual fashions, politics, social status, gender, personal taste, family ties, and other variables of time, place, and circumstance. As...

PART TWO: The Transnational Travels of the Yijing

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pp. 125-128

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CHAPTER 4 The Changes in East Asia

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pp. 129-169

Although the specific circumstances under which the Yijing found its way to various East Asian countries naturally differed, there seem to be certain similarities in the way that it traveled. In the first place, from the early centuries of the common era into the late nineteenth century, the...

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CHAPTER 5 The Westward Travels of the Changes

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pp. 170-210

In several respects the transmission of the Changes to the West parallels the process by which Buddhism and Daoism traveled to Europe and the Americas. In each case Western “missionaries” played a part in the process, and in each case there were varied responses over...

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Concluding Remarks

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pp. 211-224

Despite the great and often glaring differences separating the Yijing from such religious classics as the Bible, the Talmud, the Qur’an, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Lotus Sutra, it deserves to be considered one of the great works of spiritually inspired world literature.

Notes

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pp. 225-250

Bibliography

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pp. 251-264

Index

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pp. 265-278