Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

List of Tables

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

This project began as many do in political science; at a political science conference panel titled “Institutional Development of the Senate.” Wendy Schiller was a presenter on a paper on the effects of the Seventeenth Amendment on the interaction of same-state senators, and Gerald Gamm...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-19

U.S. senators have not always been elected by the public. The popular stage on which U.S. senators walk, and their place in modern plebiscitary politics, makes it easy to forget that for the first half of the Senate’s history, senators did not derive their electoral mandates from the people—at least...

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2. A Theory of Indirect Election

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pp. 20-50

In order to examine the election of U.S. senators before the passage of the Seventeenth Amendment, it is necessary to construct a framework of expectations about how such elections should have proceeded. This chapter does just that.
Our framework attempts to meld two strands of political science research...

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3. Candidate Emergence, Political Ambition, and Seat Value

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pp. 51-81

The stage has been set for a deeper analysis of who emerged as candidates for the U.S. Senate and their motivations for seeking the office. Modern scholars of the Senate who reference this period rely heavily on anecdotal and even literary descriptions as a basis for examining who became a U.S...

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4. Party as Gatekeeper: Canvass, Convention, and Caucus as Nomination Mechanisms

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pp. 82-120

Agenda control, as much as any other idea, has guided the study of legislatures for the past decade. Within rational choice theories of legislatures, institutions such as committees and party leaders determine what manages to get considered on the floor, and how it is considered. Committees are...

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5. Political Dynamics and Senate Representation

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pp. 121-156

Senator-elect Ambrose Burnside (R-RI) was remarkably candid in his acceptance speech following his win on the twenty-eighth joint session ballot in 1875, acknowledging that his own party was divided over his election and that he would have to work hard to win majority support during this term...

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6. Senate Electoral Responsiveness under Indirect and Direct Election

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pp. 157-198

The Seventeenth Amendment is one of the most significant changes in the U.S. electoral system to have been brought about through amending the Constitution. It changed the theory about who senators represented by shifting the focus from state governments per se to state residents. As a practical...

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7. Myth and Reality of the Seventeenth Amendment

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pp. 199-218

These were the words that state representative Blazejewski (D-RI) used when the Rhode Island house voted to symbolically ratify the Seventeenth Amendment on June 26, 2013, one hundred years after it was adopted.¹ Rhode Island had originally refused to ratify the amendment because the...

References

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pp. 219-226

Index

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pp. 227-240