Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations and Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xviii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

In 1972, Democratic candidate George McGovern captured only Massachusetts in the presidential election. This crushing defeat cemented the reputation of the state as the unrivaled bastion of American liberalism. The outbreak of the infamous busing crisis just a few years later, however, gave the...

Part I. Suburban Activism

read more

1. No Ordinary Suburbs

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-42

Political scientist Robert C. Wood began his influential 1959 critique of suburban political ideology, Suburbia: Its People and Their Politics, with a disclaimer. The MIT professor and Lincoln resident deflected accusations that it might be hypocritical that he chose “to live in a place I criticize so strongly...

read more

2. Good Neighbors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-70

During the same week as the March on Washington, on August 31, 1963, thirty protesters stormed on to the Lexington Battle Green, the site of the famous “shot heard round the world” and mythical birthplace of the American Revolution. Singing “We Shall Overcome,” the group, predominantly...

read more

3. A Multiracial World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-96

On a Saturday afternoon in the spring of 1969, the Neileys hosted the family of one of their daughters’ classmates at their Lincoln home, set on a backdrop of two acres of woods with a tennis court and horse-filled barn. Seven-year-old Rhonda Williams played Monopoly with the three Neiley...

read more

4. Grappling with Growth

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-122

On October 19, 1972, local resident Claire Ellis penned an impassioned plea to the Concord Journal in response to plans to expand a section of the Route 2 highway in the town. Ellis believed that widening the roadway threatened the measures Concord had taken throughout the postwar period...

read more

5. Political Action for Peace

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-146

On October 15, 1969, forty thousand people joined a candlelight procession from the Washington Monument to the Capitol, twenty thousand businessmen attended an event on Wall Street, and more than a hundred thousand Massachusetts citizens converged on the Boston Common, all to participate...

Part II. Massachusetts Liberals

read more

6. A New Center

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-172

Just days before the Massachusetts presidential primary in April 1972, the Association of Technical Professionals (ATP) invited Democratic candidate George McGovern to speak at Bentley College in Waltham, adjacent to the Route 128 highway. During the early 1970s, the end of the Vietnam War produced...

read more

7. Open Suburbs vs. Open Space

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-198

“I have always thought of my community to be the bastion of suburban liberalism,” lamented a Newton resident in 1970. “However the recent controversy over the Newton Community Development Foundation have shown my assumptions to be mistaken.”¹ The commentator, Frederick Andelman...

read more

8. Tightening the Belt

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-226

In September 1974, federal judge W. Arthur Garrity received a poignant handwritten request from an African American girl sent to South Boston High under his court order for the mandatory desegregation of the Boston Public Schools. The girl explained that she and her nine siblings were so...

read more

9. No One Home to Answer the Phone

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-250

In April 1975, as the struggle over mandatory desegregation continued to embroil the city of Boston, a coalition of women from the antibusing group ROAR and antiabortion organization Massachusetts Citizens for Life (MCFL) disrupted a rally in support of the state Equal Rights Amendment...

read more

10. From Taxachusetts to the Massachusetts Miracle

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-280

In late November 1982, newly reelected governor Michael Dukakis addressed the Massachusetts High Technology Council (MHTC) at its annual meeting at a Newton hotel abutting the Route 128 highway. The presidents of the major high-tech firms in the Route 128 area had formed the MHTC...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-288

The 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston confirmed the inextricable ties between the state of Massachusetts, Boston, and the Democratic Party. The event marked Massachusetts’ effort to confront its image as out of touch with the rest of the country, the city’s attempt to overcome its reputation...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 289-356

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 357-368