Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

It is a mark of the best history writing that it makes us rethink what we thought we knew. Giusto Traina's book is no exception. His idea was both simple and brilliant -- to approach the period we now call "Late Antiquity" by taking just one year and presenting its events and its regional contexts in a panoramic perspective round the Mediterranean ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

I wish to thank the publisher Laterza for coming up with this annalistic format and encouraging me to follow an unusual approach to the study of ancient history. Jean-Michel Carrié, Andrea Giardina, and Michel-Yves Perrin have read the manuscript, and their invaluable...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xix

This book will examine the events and microevents of a single year on a scale that will be as global as is possible. The chosen year is 428 AD.1 This historiographical approach is not unheard of, but is unusual for ancient history. There have been individual or collective works devoted to epoch-making dates...

read more

I: The Travels of Flavius Dionysius and the End of Armenia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

To start our journey, we go back to Antioch, the capital of Syria and the headquarters of the Roman army in the East. An imperial diplomatic delegation, escorted by an elite military unit, left the eastern gate of the city and moved towards the Persian Empire. At the same time, a group of Iranic plenipotentiaries...

read more

II: The World of Nestorius: Bishops, Monks, and Saracens

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-16

Having concluded his sensitive diplomatic mission, Flavius Dionysius returned to Antioch, but he did not stay there long. The general soon had to set off on his travels to carry out another important mission: to escort the Syrian cleric Nestorius from the monastery close to Antioch’s city gates...

read more

III: On the Pilgrim’s Road

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-26

The military unit required to escort Nestorius to Constantinople was organized in February and March. It was not prudent to travel by sea at this time of year, and Flavius Dionysius would have had no choice but to travel overland along a set route with post houses at regular intervals. This imperial...

read more

IV: The New Rome and Its Prince

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-40

On 10 April 428, the Tuesday after Palm Sunday, Nestorius was officially appointed bishop of Constantinople in one of those complex ceremonies that mixed Roman tradition with Christian symbolism, for which the Byzantine Empire became famous.1 Theoretically, he was just a bishop...

read more

V: The Anatomy of an Empire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-50

In 428, the empire was close to reunification. Three years earlier, Theodosius had sent an army to free the Empire of the West from the usurper John and place on the western throne little Valentinian III, the grandson of Theodosius the Great and Theodosius II’s cousin. The emperor was only...

read more

VI: From Ravenna to Nola: Italy in Transition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 51-62

In the system of power restored by Theodosius II, the Empire of the West was assigned to little Valentinian III. The emperor was still a child entrusted to the care of his tutor, one of those “child princes” that caused such outrage in senatorial circles.1 But the world had changed, and traditional...

read more

VII: Trial Runs for the Middle Ages

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 63-80

For the moment, Italy was not afraid of the barbarian menace, due to the rapprochement between Ravenna and Constantinople, and also the wisdom and competence of the determined and, it has to be said, utterly ruthless imperial generals. Not everyone, however, was willing to give them...

read more

VIII: Waiting for the Vandals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-92

Aetius's operations in 428 managed to regain ground in the Rhineland and on the Channel, but the far West remained in the hands of barbarians who had settled in the Iberian Peninsula twenty years earlier. Many of these events were recorded in the chronicle of the Galician Hydatius...

read more

IX: Pagans and Christians on the Nile

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-104

Egypt was the most populous territory in the entire Mediterranean. Because of the exceptional fertility of its soil, the Nile Valley provided most of the grain that was shipped to Constantinople.1 For about half a century, the province had been enjoying a special degree of autonomy. Power was divided...

read more

X: Easter in Jerusalem

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-116

The date for Easter, Christianity’s most important festival at the time, clearly had to be carefully calculated for each year, and in Egypt, the patriarch of Alexandria sent a letter as early as Epiphany to all the communities announcing the start of Lent and the date of Easter...

read more

XI: The Great King and the Seven Princesses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-128

In spite of the now irreversible changes triggered by the migrations of peoples and political instability, there was still an entity that could be defined as “Rome,” which was acknowledged as such by its subjects and its enemies, and maintained its ancient authority over the Mediterranean world...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-132

Our journey ends here. It is well known what would happen next. The western part of the Roman Empire survived for about a half century, and the new Rome would take on the mantle of the old one. We must, however, secure the image of 428 AD and its aftermath. The year...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-182

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-203