Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Philosophical logic, in one of several senses of the term, is just the part of logic dealing with proposed extensions of or alternatives to classical logic. Th e aim of this book is...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

My personal debts go far beyond the published literature cited in the references at the end of the volume. My fi rst teacher of logic, the late Ivo Th omas, introduced me to the lore of...

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CHAPTER ONE: Classical Logic

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pp. 1-12

What is philosophical logic? For the reader who has some acquaintance with classical or textbook logic—as it is assumed that readers here do—the question admits an easy answer. Philosophical logic as understood here is the part of logic dealing with...

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CHAPTER TWO: Temporal Logic

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pp. 13-39

The argument cannot be treated by classical sentential logic, since such a compound as “Publius will vote and then Quintus will vote” (or the reverse), unlike the simple “Publius will vote and Quintus will vote,” is not truth-functional. The argument does...

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CHAPTER THREE: Modal Logic

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pp. 40-70

As temporal logic is concerned with the relationships among was and is and will be, or past and present and future, so modal logic is concerned with the relationships among may be and...

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CHAPTER FOUR: Conditional Logic

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pp. 71-98

Conditionals are instances of “if A, B” or “B, if A.” Th e A-position is called the antecedent or protasis position and the B-position the consequent or apodasis position. Conditionals come in...

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CHAPTER FIVE: Relevantistic Logic

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pp. 99-120

Objections have been raised against the classical treatment of logical implication or logical consequence for counting B as an implication or consequence of A1, … , An in two degenerate cases: first, the case...

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CHAPTER SIX: Intuitionistic Logic

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pp. 121-142

According to classical mathematics, one can prove that there exist irrational numbers a and b such that ab is rational as follows. Consider...

References

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pp. 143-148

Index

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pp. 149-153