Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

My great thanks go out to everyone who contributed to making this collection possible, which grew out of a highly successful and inspiring workshop I had the pleasure of organizing at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at the University of Munich during my time as Carson...

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Introduction: Ecocritical Film Studies and the Effects of Affect, Emotion, and Cognition

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pp. 1-20

Moving Environments explores the role played by affect and emotion in the production and reception of films that centrally feature natural environments and nonhuman actors, both real and animated. Affect—our automatic, visceral response to a given film or sequence—and emotion—our cognitive...

PART I: General and Theoretical Considerations

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1. Emotion and Affect in Eco-films: Cognitive and Phenomenological Approaches

David Ingram

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pp. 23-40

In this chapter, I present a theoretical framework for analyzing “eco-films” in terms of the cognitive, emotional, and affective responses they elicit in their viewers. I define an “eco-film” broadly as any film that can be interpreted as addressing ecological or environmental issues, whether more or less explicitly...

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2. Emotions of Consequence? Viewing Eco-documentaries from a Cognitive Perspective

Alexa Weik von Mossner

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pp. 41-60

In this chapter, I will investigate the emotional appeal of eco-documentaries and ask whether they engage our emotions in ways that are different from those we experience during the watching of a fiction film with an environmentalist theme. Documentaries are often thought to be categorically different...

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3. Irony and Contemporary Ecocinema: Theorizing a New Affective Paradigm

Nicole Seymour

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pp. 61-78

Generally speaking, ecocinema is serious business. From low- and midbudget documentaries (An Inconvenient Truth [2006], The 11th Hour [2007], The Cove [2009], Queen of the Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us? [2010]) to big-budget fiction films (The Day after Tomorrow [2004], The Constant...

PART II: Anthropomorphism and the Non-Human in Documentary Film

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4. On the “Inexplicable Magic of Cinema”: Critical Anthropomorphism, Emotion, and the Wildness of Wildlife Films

Bart H. Welling

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pp. 81-102

The anthropomorphization of animals, traditionally defined as the oneway projection of uniquely human emotions and characteristics onto non-human beings conceived of as radically “other,” was attacked by scientists in the twentieth century as a “dangerous pit” or even a kind of mental disorder.¹...

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5. Emotion, Argumentation, and Documentary Traditions: Darwin’s Nightmare and The Cove

Belinda Smaill

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pp. 103-120

Media attention to the acceleration and consequences of environmental degradation has been increasing over the past two decades. However, the influence of environmentally focused documentary was cemented with the success of An Inconvenient Truth in 2006.¹ The cluster of films concerned...

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6. Documenting Animal Rights and Environmental Ethics at Sea

Robin L. Murray and Joseph K. Heumann

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pp. 121-140

The Academy Award–winning documentary The Cove (2009) captures viewers’ attention immediately with its opening shots in Taiji, Japan, where its unlikely hero Ric O’Barry discusses the origin of his mission: “Here it is … the town of Taiji, the little town with a really big secret,” he exclaims...

PART III: The Effects and Affects of Animation

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7. Animation, Realism, and the Genre of Nature

David Whitley

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pp. 143-158

The ground that this paper sets out to explore really takes us back to first principles. I want to consider, from a fresh angle, cinema’s uniquely affective power in enabling reflection on the environment within which we live. Anat Pick has described this power as inherent within “cinema’s immediacy...

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8. What Can a Film Do? Assessing Avatar’s Global Affects

Adrian Ivakhiv

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pp. 159-180

What better study of cinematic affect than a blockbuster that broke all box-office records to become the most widely seen movie of all time, a film that explicitly portrays an eco-social utopia being viciously attacked by— and successfully fighting off—a colonial-capitalist army bent on domination...

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9. Animated Ecocinema and Affect: A Case Study of Pixar’s UP

Pat Brereton

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pp. 181-198

This chapter will focus on a case study of Pixar’s UP which ostensibly appears to subvert the branded studio model of Disney, while promoting a new generational engagement with ecological and other issues. Pixar’s success is due, not only to their superior skills and craftsmanship across scripting and...

PART IV: The Affect of Place and Time

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10. Moving Home: Documentary Film and Other Remediations of Post-Katrina New Orleans

Janet Walker

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pp. 201-224

A recent talk by the pioneering human geographer Yi-Fu Tuan was advertised under the provocative title “Home as Elsewhere.”¹ These might be construed as fighting words for New Orleanians who departed precipitously under a mandatory evacuation order as Hurricane Katrina bore down, or...

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11. Evoking Sympathy and Empathy: The Ecological Indian and Indigenous Eco-activism

Salma Monani

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pp. 225-248

Defying socio-cultural and economic hegemonies often seems impossible. Yet it is precisely these hegemonies that many indigenous groups, faced with both historical and ongoing marginalization, work to confront politically. In their various struggles for recognition, many indigenous groups have...

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12. Affect and Environment in Two Artists’ Films and a Video

Sean Cubitt

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pp. 249-266

Discussions of affect and emotion in contemporary cultural criticism, including those of the most sophisticated commentators (for example, Ticinieto Clough [2000]), tend to build upon older strata of discourse that seem very frequently to lie upon a base of Nietzsche’s distinction between...

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List of Contributors

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pp. 267-270

Pat Brereton is currently Head of School of Communications at Dublin City University in Ireland. As a film and media scholar, he has published widely in ecology and environmental communication. His books include Hollywood Utopia: Ecology in Contemporary American Cinema (Intellect, 2005); Continuum...

Index

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pp. 271-290