Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Series Editor's Preface

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pp. vii-x

George Copway—or “Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh,” which has been translated as “He Who Stands Forever” and as “Standing Firm” (Smith 6, 30n7)—was born near Trenton, Canada West (now Ontario), in 1818. Raised as...

The Traditional History and Characteristic Sketches of the Ojibway Nation

Book Contents, Dedication

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pp. 3-6

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Preface

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pp. 7-10

In compliance with the oft-repeated request of a number of literary friends, I present this volume to the public. In doing so there is another motive that has influenced me, and I may be pardoned, if here, at the commencement of my task, I briefly record it...

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1. The Country of the Ojibways

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pp. 11-21

The extent of territory occupied by the Ojibway nation, is the largest of any Indian possessions of which there is any definite knowledge.
When the Champlain traders met them in 1610, its eastern boundary was marked by the waters of Lakes Huron and Michigan...

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2. Their Origin, or Course of Migration According to Their Traditions

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pp. 22-25

In listening to the traditions of the Indians in their wigwams, the traveller will learn that the chiefs are the repositories of the history of their ancestors. With these traditions there are rules to follow by which to determine whether they are true or false. By these rules I have been governed in my researches...

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3. Their Wild Game

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pp. 26-35

There is, doubtless, a greater variety of game to be found in the Ojibway country than in any other equal extent of western territory. The northern part is not so well supplied with large game as that district near the head waters of the Wisconsin, Chippeway, St. Croix, Mississippi, and Red Rivers...

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4. Plays and Exercises

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pp. 36-43

I believe all the Indian nations of this continent have amusements among them. Those of the prairie nations are different from those of the Ojibways, suitable to their wide, open fields. The plays I am about to describe are the principal games practised by the people...

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5. Their Wars with the Sioux

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pp. 44-51

For centuries have the Ojibways and Siouxs been at enmity with each other. Cessation of hostilities for a few years has only served to strengthen for renewed conflict. These wars first originated, as I have before stated, in the question of the...

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6. Their War between the Iroquis and Western Hurons, Terminating in the Wars between the Ojibways and Iroquis in Canada West

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pp. 52-57

More than two hundred winters have clothed the mountains of the north with snow, which as many summer suns have melted, since the battle shout of the Hurons, in their once happy and peaceful homes, died away, and the Iroquis shouted their note of triumph...

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7. The War between the Ojibways and the Eastern Iroquis

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pp. 58-62

Before the dispersion of the Hurons no difficulty existed between the Ojibways and the eastern Iroquis, but the western Hurons often waylaid the hunters of the Ojibway nation, and continuing so to do eventually aroused the warwhoop of revenge far and near...

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8. The War between the Ojibways and the Eastern Iroquis

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pp. 63-68

In the last chapter we left Wah-boo-jeeg standing upon an overhanging cliff. For a moment he gazed around upon the war-clad throng in canoes before him, then spoke to them as follows:— ...

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9. Their Legendary Stories and Historical Tales

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pp. 69-84

The Ojibways have a great number of legends, stories, and historical tales, the relating and hearing of which, form a vast fund of winter evening instruction and amusement. There is not a lake or mountain that has not connected with it some story of delight or wonder, and nearly every beast and bird...

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10. Their Language and Their Writings

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pp. 85-96

The Ojibway language, or the language of the Algonquin stock, is perhaps the most widely spoken of any in North America. The Atlantic tribes partook of this idiom when they were first discovered...

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11. Their Government

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pp. 97-103

The rulers of the Ojibways were inheritors of the power they held. However, when a new country was conquered, or new dominions annexed, the first rulers were elected to their offices. Afterwards, the descendants of these elected chiefs...

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12. Their Religious Belief

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pp. 104-118

The Ojibway nation believed in a great Good Spirit, and in a Bad Spirit. They had also “gods innumerable,” among which was “the god of war,” “the god of hunting,” and “the god of the fowls of the air.” ...

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13. The Ojibway or Chippeway Residents of Canada West

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pp. 119-131

The Ojibway nation now occupies land within the bounds of two governments,—the American and the British. The entire, according to Drake, in 1842, was thirty thousand, which is not far from the truth. The best work upon the Indians of North America, is that deservedly popular book written by...

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14. Missions and Improvements

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pp. 132-136

The mission of the Episcopal Church at the Sault St. Marie, was given up soon after the Rev. Mr. Murray left the country, on account of the removal of the Indians from their town to an island in Lake Huron, by order of Sir Francis Broadhead...

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15. The Early Discovery of the North-West—The First Traders and Adventurers

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pp. 137-153

The early discovery of the north-west has been a subject of considerable interest—and as there is much valuable information in the following, which we take from one of the Minesota territory papers, prepared by the Rev. Edward D. Neill, the research which is here found will be...

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16. Further Notices of the North-West

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pp. 154-164

The first British traveller to the falls of St. Anthony, in the introduction to his book of travels, expresses the opinion, ‘that at some future period,’ the then uncultivated wilderness would become the abode of a civilized people, and that ‘stately palaces, and solemn temples, with gilded spires...

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17. The North American Indians in General

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pp. 165-190

Being desirous of doing all that I can towards bettering the condition of my brethren, I here subjoin four letters, originally addressed to the “Saturday Evening Post” of Philadelphia, on the subject of Indian Civilization,—the plan which I have presented before different legislatures, and recently in...

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Afterword, Further Reading

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pp. 191-208

As their name and location suggest, afterwords begin where the texts they discuss end. They reflect upon the chapters preceding and offer envois to avenues of inquiry. While their placement at the back of the book can liberate readers to develop their own impressions before they encounter...