Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-2

This is not a particularly long book within the realm of scholarship. Nevertheless, a number of institutions and individuals provided crucial help and support. The University of South Carolina supported work on this project in 2006, before it was even a book, with a Research and Productive Scholarship...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-16

The publication and reception of “Was gesagt werden muss” (“What Must Be Said”), the controversial “poem” that Günter Grass disseminated on April 4, 2012, in Süddeutsche Zeitung, La Repubblica, and El Pais, paradigmatically illustrates diverse and crucial issues surrounding the German memory of...

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1. Absence: Guilt and Shame

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pp. 17-46

Historians and sociologists, especially in contemporary anti-Semitism studies, often regard the nexus of trans- generational guilt among Germans as an “either/or” paradigm, and much of the debate on contemporary anti-Semitism in Germany seems to follow this dualistic pattern. Either Germans are—still...

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2. Gendered Anti-Semitism: Femininity, the Belle Juive, and the “Jewish Mother”

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pp. 47-76

Hilene Flanzbaum, a prominent American scholar of Jewish studies,¹ recently told me that she frequently utilizes Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader (Der Vorleser, 1995) as teaching material in her Jewish studies Holocaust class.² Since this international bestseller was in 2008 released as a highly successful...

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3. Masculinities and the Body

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pp. 77-106

As Kaja Silverman so poignantly reminds us in her seminal Male Subjectivity at the Margins, there is nothing “natural” or culturally innocent about sexuality.¹ This is particularly true when sexuality is represented alongside additional markers of cultural or ethnic “otherness.” Gender studies, and...

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4. Jews and Germans in America

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pp. 107-134

“The black guy had a muscular neck with a pronounced Adam’s apple. Kalf’s thumbs found purchase there and he pressed it hard to the sound of a shrill scream.”¹ This particular scene, reminiscent of a film shot, where a young African American male is portrayed in the most stereotypically racist terms as a...

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Epilogue

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pp. 135-138

My readings suggest that current German representations of Jews and Germans continue to be dominated by underlying emotions of guilt, silence, and obscured anti- Semitism. The anti- Semitism resulting from guilt rejection that was prominent in works by older German writers such as Günter Grass and...

Notes

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pp. 139-162

Bibliography

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pp. 163-174

Index

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pp. 175-178