Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. vii-xxiv

In 1938, when Dona Senhorinha Freire Barbosa was eighteen years old, the Mission of Folkloric Research visited her hometown of Tacaratu, Pernambuco, as part of a trek through Northeast Brazil to record folk music. Recordings of Dona Senhorinha—informant 490—contributed to a project that profoundly shaped notions of Brazilian musical patrimony. The Mission...

Part I

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1. Staging Tradition

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pp. 3-19

A week after the Associação Respeita Januário meeting, I drove to Arcoverde. The BR-232 highway running from Recife to Arcoverde had been recently repaved. Its lanes were doubled, reducing travel time to Caruaru, a city located 120 km from the capital. Billboards along the road advertised musical traditions to tourists. Caruaru, the largest city along the route, is a...

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2. Museums

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pp. 20-33

When Lula Calixto died on November 15, 1999, his death triggered a social earthquake, shifting the tectonic plates of the samba de coco families in Arcoverde. Almost immediately friction emerged between the Calixto and Gomes families on one side and the Lopes sisters on the...

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3. Nostalgia and Apocalypse

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pp. 34-57

The Lopes and Calixto museums assembled artifacts to present particular family histories. The two families asserted claims to a musical heritage that, they hoped, would thrust them into a future of social recognition and fame. They were fazendo cultura—making culture, or making themselves cultural, thrusting themselves into the public sphere. They used the...

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4. Television

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pp. 58-74

When a journalist from TV Globo came to Arcoverde in the weeks leading up to the São João Festival in June 2004, the samba de coco families were excited by the prospect of being featured on television.1 It was an opportunity for the story of their music and dance to be projected to a nationwide audience. For me, it was a chance to accompany the filming of...

Part II

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5. Festival

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pp. 77-91

During the first week of June 2004 a temporary casa de taipa, a house made out of mud, was erected in downtown Arcoverde’s main traffic circle (see figure 5.1). During the ten days of the São João Festival, it would serve as a museum in honor of two samba de coco musicians: Lula Calixto and Ivo Lopes. Once completed, the mud shack resembled those found on the outskirts...

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6. Tourism

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pp. 92-113

Beginning in the year 2000, after Lula’s death raised the profile of the Calixto family, Coco Raízes began to stage performances of varying degrees of formality in the Alto do Cruzeiro neighborhood. Many of these events were planned and promoted by the municipal tourism bureau, with a temporary stage erected next to the cement cross and scenic overlook. Others...

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7. Elegy

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pp. 114-135

Upon returning to Austin, Texas, my wife Laura and I displayed on our walls, clipped to clipboards, some eight-by-ten-inch photographs of Assis Calixto, Ciço Gomes, and other musicians from Arcoverde. After we put them up we joked that they were my “specimens,” acknowledging the critique of the ethnographer as butterfly collector. Quickly, however, it struck...

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Epilogue

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pp. 136-142

The trupé, a dance to tamp down a dirt floor, accomplishes practical labor as it celebrates it. It is an idealized image of the joyous collective construction of a home. Sophisticated, nimble samba stepping won’t do—this job requires a heavier stomp that, when performed by many dancers at once, sounds like a freight train thundering past. The ground beneath the dancers...

Notes

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pp. 143-148

Bibliography

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pp. 149-152

Index, Other Works in the Series, About the Author

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pp. 153-166