Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This project has been a collaborative effort in the best sense of the word. The editors are faculty and staff members of the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE), which is part of the Department of Museums, Archives, and Rare Books at Kennesaw State University...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xxxvi

More so than any war in history, World War II was a woman’s war. Women, motivated by patriotism, the opportunity for new experiences, and the desire to serve, participated widely in the global conflict. Within the Allied countries, women of all ages proved to be invaluable...

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1. Into the Factories

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pp. 1-54

When men left to serve in the armed forces during World War II, their absence created a labor shortage throughout the United States. By 1943, government officials and industry leaders looked to women workers to contribute to the production needs created by war. Nearly six million...

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2. New Opportunities, New Challenges

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pp. 55-88

Although many women moved into industrial labor during the war, opportunities in white-collar jobs also expanded for women. Far and away the largest employer of women was the federal government. “Government girls,” as they were popularly known, stood one million...

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3. Women’s Auxiliary Services

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pp. 89-122

With courage and determination, more than 350,000 women joined the United States military auxiliary services during World War II in the male-dominated armed forces. These American women made up part of the more than 1.5 million women who assisted the Allies during the...

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4. “Make Do and Mend”. Women and the Home Front

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pp. 123-174

In addition to filling labor shortages created when millions of men joined the armed forces, many women helped maintain stable conditions at home in the face of the social and economic turmoil created by World War II. When the government introduced rationing in response...

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5. The Secret War

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pp. 175-228

American women served as spies and in resistance groups that engaged in sophisticated activities of deception and sabotage against the Axis powers during World War II. But the secret war also had different and in some cases darker connotations, as the US government turned...

Appendix 1. Timeline

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pp. 229-232

Appendix 2. Discussion Questions and Assignments

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pp. 233-234

Appendix 3. Classroom and Research Activities

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pp. 235-240

Annotated Bibliography

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pp. 241-247

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About the Museum of History and Holocaust Education

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p. 248

The Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE) at Kennesaw State University, in Georgia, presents public events, exhibits, and educational resources focused on World War II and the Holocaust in an effort to promote education and dialogue about the past and its...

Index

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pp. 249-260

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About the Editors

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pp. 261-262

Dr. Julia Brock holds a PhD in public history from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is the director of interpretation at the Museum of History and Holocaust Education, Kennesaw State University. Previously, she has served as the assistant reviews editor...