Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, About the Author

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xxviii

This book was born out of a deep and abiding love for Hodinöhsö:ni’ narrative, community, ways of knowing, artistic expression, and embattled resistance in the face of the settler colonial project. I write from a space of profound investment in Hodinöhsö:ni’ perspectives and...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxix-xxx

I am grateful to the artists, authors, and directors whose work provided inspiration for this book. Tracey Penelope Tekahentáhkhwa Deer, Eric Gansworth, Shelley Niro, and James Thomas Aronhióta’s Stevens have all been incredibly generous with their time in discussing their work and...

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Note on Language and Orthography

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pp. xxxi-xxxiv

Throughout this study, I use the Seneca language, or Onöndowa’ga:’ gawënö’, and the orthography employed by Phyllis Eileen Williams Bardeau in her Seneca language dictionary and books. Bardeau’s Definitive Seneca: It’s in the Word is my primary reference. In cases where the...

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1. Two Row Wampum in James Thomas Stevens’s A Bridge Dead in the Water and Tokinish

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pp. 1-26

This chapter explores how James Thomas Stevens (Akwesasne Mohawk) dramatizes the need to honor the Two Row Wampum in his poetry collections, A Bridge Dead in the Water and Tokinish. While intended as an affi rmation of equality, separation, and sovereignty, various settler...

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2. The Covenant Chain in Eric Gansworth’s Fiction, Poetry, Memoir, and Paintings: The Canandaigua Treaty Belt as Critical Indigenous Economic Critique

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pp. 27-64

Friendship treaty belts have a long history amongst northeastern Native Americans. In 1638, the Hurons created a friendship belt to record their agreement to allow Jesuits to build a wooden church on their lands. The belt portrays a central cross symbol, flanked on either side by...

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3. Tribal Feminist Recuperation of the Mother of Nations in Shelley Niro’s Kissed by Lightning

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pp. 65-80

In roughly AD 1142 a Wendat man paddled across Lake Ontario in a white stone canoe.² He was conceived without his mother having intercourse with a mortal man, “a divine birth” of auspicious circumstances that was foretold by in a dream brought by a messenger from the...

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4. Kahnawake’s Reclamation of Adoption Practices in Tracey Deer’s Documentary and Fiction Films: Reading the Adoption Belt in a Post-Indian Act Era

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pp. 81-102

This essay considers the relationship between the Adoption Belt, the process of adoption, and the portrayal of identity formation in the Mohawk community of Kahnawake in the films of Tracey Deer, and I argue that Mohawk director Deer’s documentary and fictional films and...

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5. Conclusion: Wampum and the Future of Hodinöhsö:ni’ Narrative Epistemology

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pp. 103-112

Wampum belts carry knowledges that have implications and applications that are far reaching, touching upon topics as germane as cultural integrity and transmission, sovereignty and self-determination, and subjects as contentious as treaty rights and their assertions in manifold...

Notes

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pp. 113-136

Bibliography

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pp. 137-148

Index

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pp. 149-152

Other Works in the Series, Back Cover

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p. 153