Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-22

There is no more powerful symbol of life in New Orleans and the region around it than Mardi Gras. The annual festival along the central Gulf Coast of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama is an emblem of the area's historical...

read more

Strange Mergers and Deep Mixture Making

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-28

It is impossible to comprehend Mardi Gras or New Orleans or, for that matter, the Americas, without confronting the concept of creolization. "Creole" is an adjective and a noun heard throughout Louisiana and the Gulf Coast, and it is widely associated elsewhere with that region through movies, advertising, and tourism. But the term has a...

read more

The Spanish Tinge, Second-Line, and the Black Atlantic Origins of Jazz

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-36

While the sources of similarities between the musics of New Orleans,rural Louisiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti, and French Guiana between Cuban and Afro-French music are not so apparent. But even a listen to their musical interactions uncovers an astounding amount of cultural ingenuity and confluence as cultures, musicians, and...

read more

A Festival of Liberation, Protest, Affirmation, and Celebration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-58

Mardi Gras is but one of many festivals that grew not only from the process of creolization, but also from the few ways in which slaves were able to obtain a glimpse of New World freedoms. Slave holidays flashpoints of revolt, or if not, of unbridled riots. Afterward, most of them served as archives of past indignities, fueled by a replaying of...

read more

Carnival Knowledge: Mardi Gras in and Beyond New Orleans

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-74

Mardi Gras is historically associated with French and Spanish populations along the Gulf Coast. However, many groups such as AngloAmerican andJewish cultural elites in Uptown New Orleans, Gays in the French Quarter, and African American middle-class men and women in Mobile now...

read more

Carnival Along the Gulf Coast

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-96

Although smaller in scale and less widely known than the New Orleans Carnival, Mardi Gras in Mobile has been celebrated in various ways since the beginning of the nineteenth century. The Cowbellions were formed in the 1830s and later began ordering their costumes from Paris, but...

read more

Conclusion: Mardi Gras Will Never Die

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-102

The conditions after Katrina and Rita demand that vernacular creativity and the basic rules of creolization be brought to bear on the situation. Improvisation, community bricolage, breaking, and calling out provide the pattern for a future, whatever the details. The world is still there to be turned...