Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

Kenneth R. Johnson

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pp. vii-xvi

Dr. Weymouth T. Jordan, a native of North Carolina and graduate of the University of North Carolina, joined the history faculty at Judson College in 1938. He thought of himself as an American and Southern historian, but he was sensitive to the fact that good regional and national histories are built upon sound...

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Preface

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pp. xvii-xx

This little book relates to ante-bellum Alabama's social and economic developments. It deals with a city, a town, a planter family, rural social life, certain attitudes of white people toward Negroes, and Alabama's early crusade in behalf of agriculture and manufacturing. Its purpose is to present certain case studies with the hope that by...

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1. Metropolis by the Sea

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pp. 1-21

Among the many factors affecting the rise of Mobile to a position of importance as an agricultural market place in the pre-Civil War period, the most significant were port facilities, accessible and navigable rivers, cotton production, and the population of the region in which it was located.1 For these reasons perhaps more than any...

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2. A Black Belt Town

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pp. 22-40

In many respects the settlement and early growth of the town of Marion, Perry County, serves as a typical example of the rise to importance of such establishments in the Alabama black belt.1 Relatively speaking, it was founded quite late in the region's history. Candidly speaking, it has not maintained the significant position...

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3. A Black Belt Planter Family

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pp. 41-61

Among the earliest settlers of Perry County was Elisha F. King who, like so many of his contemporaries, moved from Georgia in 1819 in order to take up cheap land which became available shortly after Alabama attained statehood.1 He immediately began to enter land in the county and eventually. was one of the largest holders...

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4. A Family Daybook

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pp. 62-83

Among the more valuable sources of information about actual living conditions in the Old South are documents known as daybooks. In these collections are to be found such bits of information as favorite recipes, medical care, directions of all sorts aimed at making one's existence more bearable and interesting, and many...

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5. Negro "Pecularities"

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pp. 84-105

One of the most far-reaching aspects of thought in the Old South was the general belief among white Southerners that the Negro was not a member of the same species as the white man.1 A popular contention was that Negroes possessed peculiarities which made them either susceptible or immune to certain ailments and...

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6. The Crusade for Agricultural Reform

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pp. 106-139

Because of the great and abiding interest in the production of cotton and other money crops in the Old South, there has developed a persistent conception that the people of the region were only slightly interested in such matters as scientific farming and improvement of their land.1 Indeed, since cotton was so important,...

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7. The Industrial Gospel

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pp. 140-160

One of the best-known facts about ante-bellum Alabama is that it was not a manufacturing state. Cotton mills were among its most active industrial enterprises, but the state had only fourteen cotton goods factories producing articles valued at $1,040,147 in 1860. Mobile, the state's metropolis with a...

Bibliography

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pp. 161-166

Index

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pp. 167-172