Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Figures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

This book began as a dissertation written at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. I can pinpoint its origins to a long-ago meeting with Jonathan Hay, during which he insisted on showing me reproductions of Shanghai paintings despite my total lack of interest; eighteen months later I found myself signing up to write my dissertation on Ren Bonian. I owe Jonathan a great debt for that first conversation and many others since. The late Robert...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

A group portrait by the Shanghai artist, Ren Bonian (also called Ren Yi, 1840–1895), titled Sanyou tu or Picture of Three Friends, shows three men, including the artist, united in friendship (Figure i.1). Seated cozily in a small circle on the floor, Ren Bonian together with Zeng Fengji in the middle and Zhu Jintang to the right are shown deep in conversation and appear to look up upon the arrival of a newcomer. Their gathering is demonstrably a gentlemanly one...

read more

1. The Shanghai Painted Fan: Form, Format, and Function

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-70

A fan painting by the late Qing Shanghai painter Ren Bonian (1840–1895) is a small delight. The subject is a simple one: a small bird flits into view and seems about to land on a horizontal tree branch bearing multiple peach blossoms (Figure 1.1). Dating to the 1870s, this little work is one of any number of fan paintings produced by Ren Bonian at this period in his career. With its bright colors and golden ground, appealing subject and animated handling, ...

read more

2. The Shanghai Artist in Advertising and Mass Media

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-108

An advertisement placed in Shenbao in 1880 by Zhang Xiong is useful for suggesting the parameters within which the Shanghai artist could operate:
Announcing the Opening of Zhangzhidaotang [Hall of Zhang Attaining the Dao] on Si Malu [Fuzhou Road]: This store was originally founded in the middle of the Daoguang era [1821– 1850] in Jiading . . . [selling] fine manufactured and purified pigments, medicinal spirits for...

read more

3. Shanghai Illustrations: Images and Readers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-158

In view of the importance of the artist’s representation in this period, whether verbal, textual, or pictorial, it is only appropriate that a portrait of the author is the first image to appear in Chen Yunsheng’s 1876 book, Renzhai huasheng (Renzhai’s painting legacy) (Figure 3.1). Chen’s portrait appears at a crucial point—at the end of the prefaces and just before the book’s many illustrations—and, like a genial host, the picture introduces readers to the book...

read more

4. Picturing the Shanghai Artist: Subjects and Audiences

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-214

A portrait by Ren Bonian of his father is unusual in its depiction of a close relative and a deceased subject (Figure 4.1). Dating to 1869, the painting shows Ren Songyun (also known as Ren Hesheng) in a natural setting; dressed as a scholar, he is quietly seated leaning against a large rock overlooking a rushing stream. The landscape around him—he is ringed by cliffs, trees, rocks, and water—appears remote and untouched, resembling not so much the...

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-220

The entwined ideas of artist, image, and audience are effectively embodied by an 1887 portrait by Ren Bonian of Jin Erzhen (1840–1917), also known as Jin Jishi (Figure e.1). A prominent calligrapher in this period, Jin Erzhen regularly appeared on the lists of Shanghai’s famous artists.1 Provocatively titled Picture of Mr. Jishi Admiring and Regarding Himself with Affection, the portrait shows Jin as portly and prosperous in appearance, standing alertly next...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-250

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-256

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-278

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-292