Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xx

read more

1. Peoples of the Book: Religion, Language, Nationalism, and the Politics of Sacred Text Translation

Martin J. Wein and Benjamin Hary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-34

The following exposition is a cultural critique of the phenomenon of sacred text translation, centering on the enormous global Bible translation project, but also including comparative references to the Qur’an, and to sacred texts of religions other than Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This is framed by a general discussion of the triangular relationship of language, religion, and nationalism. We bring forward...

read more

2. Jews and Muslims: Collaboration through Acknowledging the Shoah

Mehnaz M. Afridi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-54

This chapter discusses tensions between Jews and Muslims concerning issues such as genocide and politics. My own personal and academic experiences have led me to explore opportunities of collaboration for these two groups, who have typically seen each other through the lens of conflict. This account of contemporary research...

read more

3. How Health and Disease Define the Relationship among the Abrahamic Religions in the Age of Diaspora

Sander L. Gilman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-76

During the twenty-first century an issue has reappeared that can help us focus on how the relationship between the Abrahamic religions, at least in Western Europe and North America, has continued to shift. Infant male circumcision, a ritual practice strongly identified with Judaism, has come to be a litmus test for cultural adaptability...

read more

4. Inimical Friendships?—Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, Franz Rosenzweig, and Dialogue between the West and Islam

Wayne Cristaudo

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-98

Perhaps the most anti-natural injunction of the New Testament—in a religion that many have, not wrongly, defined by its anti-natural character—is the commandment to love one’s enemies. Enemies are naturally those who threaten our very existence— the extinction of the enemy is thus the most natural thing in the world.1 By contrast, loving the enemy is one of the hardest...

read more

5. Collaborating and Conflicted: Being Jewish in Secular and Multicultural Hong Kong

Zhou Xun

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-114

Hong Kong’s Jewish Film Festival (HKJFF) is Asia’s only Jewish festival. Its current trailer begins with an image tracking a man wearing a Djellaba-style long robe and hat across the desert. On his journey he is first met by a Chinese girl, then a black man wearing a kippah, an Indian woman, and finally a Caucasian looking male joins the group. The trailer ends with all of them dancing together. This trailer is based on...

read more

6. Terrorists in the Village?: Negotiating Jewish-Muslim Relations in South Asia

Yulia Egorova

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-130

In 2010, Pakistani-Canadian writer and journalist Tarek Fatah published a book under the title The Jew Is Not My Enemy: Unveiling the Myths that Fuel Muslim Anti-Semitism. The book aims to explore why Judaism and Islam are polarized in the contemporary world and offers a provocative critique of anti-Jewish and anti-Zionist...

read more

7. The Damascus Affair and the Debate on Ritual Murder in Early Victorian Britain

David Feldman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-152

On February 5, 1840, two men disappeared from the streets of Damascus. One was a Capuchin monk, Padre Tommaso, the second his servant, Ibrahim Amara. The double-disappearance and possible murder required an investigation that was undertaken by the Ottoman governor-general of Syria, Sherif Pasha, and the French...

read more

8. Interreligious Love in Contemporary German Film and Literature

Katja Garloff

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-164

One of the most influential analyses of German Jewish relations before the Holocaust is Gershom Scholem’s 1966 essay “Jews and Germans.” Scholem, who had been born into an assimilated German Jewish family but became a Zionist and in 1923 immigrated to Palestine, delivers there a trenchant critique of what he calls the “false start” of German Jewish relations in the modern age. He argues against the idea that the...

read more

9. Interrogating Diaspora: Beyond the Ethnic Mosaic—Faith, Space, and Time in London’s East End

Jane Garnett and Michael Keith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-176

This is an essay about religion, diaspora, place, and history. Its vantage-point is the East End of London, a place in which long-standing self-conscious reflection on its history as a zone of transition has the potential to illuminate many broader theoretical questions about diaspora, religion, and religion-in-diaspora. Recent works on diaspora and on the interrelated fields of religion and diaspora have cautioned against...

read more

Conclusion: Symbolic Forms and the Abrahamic Religions

Sander L. Gilman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-182

The boundaries that exist between the Abrahamic religions are real because they are symbolic and are symbolic because they are real. The essays in this volume illustrate the debates recounted in Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (1983) about the borders of the modern state. Anderson notes that these borders are where such states (and in our case read...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-194