Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Contributors page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 2-8

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-10

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-13

As we all know, strong, varied, and sometimes polarized views abound among those who seek access to and possession of antiquities. Increasingly over the course of the past few decades, organizations and interest groups have held gatherings with those of like mind to discuss...

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 14-19

Ownership of “the past”—a concept inspiring age-old struggles to possess and control ancient objects—is an essential theme in understanding our global cultural heritage. Beyond ownership, however, lies the need for stewardship: the responsibility of owners, possessors, and others interested...

read more

2. Transcending the Tangible

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-31

This book explores myriad questions associated with the ethical implications of collecting antiquities. How do we define ethical behavior? When opinions about ethical behavior clash, whose worldview should govern? Laws in some societies are...

read more

3. Provenience, Provenance, and Context(s)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-43

I would like to very briefly examine three concepts that are, I think, the victims of gossip. Because they are often seen in one another’s company, there is the assumption that they enjoy intimate relations. I do not think that it is necessarily the case, but this...

read more

4. The Protection of the Past by Intelligently Managing the Present and the Future

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-49

Before we can judge art collecting in the present and manage its role in the future, we must examine the past and understand how today’s art-collecting attitudes evolved. Art collecting today can best be understood as the acquisition of...

read more

5. The More the Merrier

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 50-63

“Who owns the past?” is a question that has long been posed in circles of experts concerned with ancient artifacts. Archaeologists, museums, native peoples, and countries of origin have sweated and battled for years over this query, and the struggle is...

read more

6. Thinking about the Sevso Treasure

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 64-79

The Sevso Treasure is an example of what are frequently called “unprovenanced antiquities.” Establishment archaeologists claim that by acquiring and showing them, collectors and museums encourage looting, whereas collectors and museum officials...

read more

7. Has the Market in Antiquities Changed in Light of Recent Legal Developments?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-97

The international trade in undocumented and often illegal antiquities contributes in significant ways to encouraging the looting of archaeological sites and losses to the historical and cultural record. Only through the controlled, scientific excavation of archaeological...

read more

8. Commentary Is It Ethics or Hypocrisy?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 98-105

The recent discussions surrounding the collecting of antiquities and the socalled ethical or unethical issues that have become such a hot topic in the popular press have been hijacked by a small group of ultra-left academics who have...

read more

9. Commentary Who Owns the Past?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 106-107

Dealing with antiquities in the United States looks very easy because it is a free trade nation; any one can buy whatever he wants, and it looks as though there are no laws limiting it. But if we look closer, we will see that it is a much harder and more...

read more

10. The Futures of Our Many Pasts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 108-123

The chapters in this volume, by design, argue for a wide and often conflicting range of approaches to the global issues associated with the acquisition, sale, and destruction of antiquities and other remaining products of past human...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 124-131

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-137