Cover

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Title page, Contributors, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Figures and Tables

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pp. ix-xii

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1. Knowing Race

John Hartigan

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pp. 3-20

What do we know about race today? Is it surprising that, after a hundred years of debate and inquiry by anthropologists, not only does the answer remain uncertain but also the very question is so fraught? In part, this reflects the deep investments modern societies have made in the notion...

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2. Race, Biology, and Culture: Rethinking the Connections

Clarence C. Gravlee

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pp. 21-42

During the late twentieth century, anthropologists and other social scientists championed the view of race as a cultural construct, not a biological reality. This view has come to dominate the humanities and social sciences almost completely: If you interacted only with scholars in these areas, you...

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3. Toppling Typologies: Developmental Plasticity and the Environmental Origins of Human Biological Variation

Christopher W. Kuzawa and Zaneta M. Thayer

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pp. 43-56

The early scientific study of human variation was founded upon an assumption that human populations could be classified according to stable types, or races, that were viewed not only as immutable but also as representative of different stages of evolutionary advancement (Stocking 1968...

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4. Toward a Cybernetics of Race: Determinism and Plasticity in Ideological and Biological Systems

Ron Eglash

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pp. 57-82

What should anthropology do with the idea of race? Proponents of racial categories maintain that race is an effective way to categorize human variation and that ignoring it means less effective medicine, policy, and research. Critics of racial categories note how social priorities have resulted...

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5. Observations on the Tenacity of Racial Concepts in Genetics Research

Linda M. Hunt and Nicole Truesdell

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pp. 83-106

The time-worn idea that the human species can be reasonably divided into biologically distinct races has long been rejected by anthropologists and many biologists. They argue that race is a social and historical fact rather than a biological reality, pointing out that there is more genetic variation...

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6. Genomics Research and Race: Refining Claims about Essentialism

Pamela L. Sankar

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pp. 107-124

More than a decade has passed since a presidential news conference announced the Human Genome Map’s completion and its status as definitive proof that “the concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis” (Weiss 2000). Even such a noteworthy declaration, however, seems not to...

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7. Looking for Race in the Mexican “Book of Life”: INMEGEN and the Mexican Genome Project

John Hartigan

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pp. 125-150

On May 11, 2009, Dr. Gerardo Jiménez-Sánchez, director of the Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), presented the president of Mexico, Felipe Calderón, with a copy of the “Mexican Book of Life.”¹ The ceremony in Los Pinos—the office and residence of the president, located...

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8. The Political Economy of Personalized Medicine, Health Disparities, and Race

Sandra Soo-Jin Lee

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pp. 151-168

W. E. B. Du Bois, in the introduction to his treatise on race relations in the United States, forewarned that the “color-line” would emerge as a central social challenge that would shape the contours of group relations. His words proved prescient for the twentieth century and continue to be...

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9. The Aimless Genome

Jeffrey C. Long

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pp. 169-186

Most human genetics researchers now agree that a series of ancient founder effects was the major force that shaped the patterns of human genetic variation seen in the world today (Hunley, Healy, and Long 2009; Ramachandran et al. 2005; Rosenberg et al. 2005). These founder effects...

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10. Conclusion

John Hartigan

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pp. 187-198

On the final day of our seminar, by way of taking stock of how our week-long discussions related to the wide range of work on race in anthropology today, we read together the “AAA Statement on Race” developed by the American Anthropological Association in 1998. Because we were...

References

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pp. 199-234

Index

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pp. 235-246

Other Titles in the Advanced Seminar Series

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pp. 247-252