Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

The essays in this volume were inspired by the acquisition in 2002 by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) of a volume (bound 1702–4) of 190 hand-colored fashion prints on paper, from the latter part of the seventeenth century. This volume, entitled Recueil des modes de la cour de France, catalog number M.2002.57.1-.190, measures...

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Introduction: Fashion and Fashion Prints in the Age of Louis XIV

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pp. xv-xxxii

Between 1676 and 1710, hundreds of fashion images rolled off the presses of the Parisian printers on the rue Saint Jacques. These engravings always had the same format: a 14¼ × 9½ inch page on which a man or woman “of quality” appeared, enclosed in a linear black frame. Beneath the frame, a caption appeared—sometimes with a bit of...

Part One. The Fashion Print

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1. The Fashion Print: An Ambiguous Object

Françoise Tétart-Vittu

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pp. 3-14

The engraved and illuminated prints of fashionable people found in the LACMA Recueil and other collections are usually placed chronologically between the sixteenth-century prints of national or regional dress and the first fashion journals of the eighteenth century (like the Gallerie des modes and the magazines published by Esnault and...

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2. Fashioning Fashionability

Kathleen Nicholson

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pp. 15-54

The delightfully varied images of fashion contained in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s rare bound volume dating from 1703–4 offer a fascinating historical insight into the taste of an individual collector or the commercial savvy of a print seller hoping to attract just such a fashion-conscious connoisseur. The prints are part of an intriguing...

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3. The Cris de Paris in the LACMA Recueil des modes

Paula Rea Radisich

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pp. 55-72

Th e dealer/editor or collector who compiled the LACMA Recueil des modes de la cour in 1703–4¹ arranged 190 selected hand-colored seventeenth-century prints according to a certain logic, moving from beautifully attired leisured classes, passing through theater, and ending with a suite of street criers, portrayed on leaves 165–89. Known as...

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4. Fashions in Prints: Considering the Recueil des modes as an Album of Prints

Marcia Reed

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pp. 73-88

Bound like a book from the shelves of an eighteenth-century aristocrat’s library, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Recueil des modes appears at first glance to be a large printed text. But upon opening the brown calf cover, one discovers neither title page bearing author’s name, place of publication, and date, nor introductory text pages...

Part Two. Contextualizing the Fashion Print

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5. Fashion as Concept and Ethic in Seventeenth-Century France

William Ray

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pp. 91-116

At the close of the seventeenth century, a young Swiss gentleman traveling in France after a stay in England organized his thoughts about the differences between the two peoples. The French he associated with extraordinary politeness, a love of visits and empty conversation, the pursuit of le bel esprit, and most of all an enthrallment to fashion...

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6. The Fashion Run Seen from Backstage: Saint-Simon’s Memoirs of Louis XIV’s Court

Malina Stefanovska

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pp. 117-134

An exploration of fashion trends at the court of Louis XIV should be prefaced by some general remarks. The notion of fashion opens up two distinct interpretive horizons: on the one hand, that of sartorial codes and habits; on the other, that of change itself, both in the aesthetic and in the moral realm. The French term la mode bears evidence...

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7. Louis XIV: King of Fashion?

Kathryn Norberg

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pp. 135-166

No figure is evoked more frequently in the history of seventeenth-century dress than Louis XIV, King of France (1638–1715). Every book on French fashion in this era mentions the king and says a few words about “absolutism.”¹ For dress historians, Louis is the king of fashion who presided over a luxurious court and created (in unspecified...

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8. Oriental Connections: Merchant Adventurers and the Transmission of Cultural Concepts

Mary Schoeser

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pp. 167-184

This chapter explores the impact of the seventeenth-century merchant adventurer on fashion in the court of Louis XIV. As an expression of ongoing research into the development of lighter and more decorative cloths during this period, it proposes that dress at this time—and for some years before—made conscious use of a so-called oriental...

Part Three. The Fashion Print as a Historical Resource

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9. The LACMA Recueil des modes

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

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pp. 187-200

Recueil des modes de la cour de France is a folio of prints in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.¹ The 190 minutely detailed, hand-colored engravings date from circa 1670 to 1692–93, in the middle years of the lengthy reign of Louis XIV. A dozen well-known artists, engravers, and publishers of the period are represented...

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10. Fashion Illustration from the Reign of Louis XIV: A Technical Study of the Paper and Colorants Used in the LACMA Recueil des modes

Soko Furuhata

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pp. 201-212

In 2001 the Conservation Center at Los Angeles County Museum was asked by the Department of Costumes and Textiles to evaluate a potential addition to the collection; a book titled Recueil des modes de la cour de France, a collection of 190 full-length costume plates from the reign of Louis XIV (1643–1715).¹ These engravings, dated between...

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11. Performing Fashion

Michael J. Hackett

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pp. 213-218

The fifth and final session of the two-day conference, “Fashion in the Age of Louis XIV,” was “Performing Fashion,” held at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 11, 2005.¹ The purpose of this final session was to show one of the costumes, illustrated in the LACMA plates, in movement and in three-dimensional space. Specifically, the costume was placed within...

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12. Recreating an Entrée, a Minuet, and a Chaconne

Emma Lewis Thomas

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pp. 219-222

An audience of about two hundred persons lined the ballroom of the William Andrews Clark Library, two rows deep on all four sides, leaving our dancer, Susan Gladstone, a long narrow space in which to show dances from the court of Louis XIV: a minuet entrée, a classic court minuet with imaginary partner, and a chaconne...

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13. Recreating a Grand Habit

Maxwell Barr

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pp. 223-232

The first step toward recreating a seventeenth-century gown was to choose the fashion print that would be used as a model. Dame en Robbe (Woman in gown [1683]), by engraver and publisher Henri Bonnart (1642–1711), was chosen from the LACMA Receuil des modes de la cour de France (plate 14). The print was essential to the process...

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14. A Seventeenth-Century Gown Rediscovered: Work in Progress

Catherine McLean, Sandra L. Rosenbaum, and Susan Renate Schmalz

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pp. 233-246

In 1988 the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) acquired a blue silk-satin gown and matching mantle, both elaborately embroidered with gold and silver metal threads (fig. 14.1). The style of the gown resembled the fashionable silhouette of the 1840s. Edward Maeder, curator of the Department of Costume and Textiles at that...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 247-258

Contributors

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pp. 259-260

Index

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pp. 261-270

Image Plates

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