Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book is ultimately the product of a dissertation completed in the Department of French and Italian at Princeton University. It could not have been written without the support of numerous people. Chief among them is my reader Sarah Kay, whose piercing insight, selfless dedication and...

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Introduction: Literature as Eschatological Scene

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pp. 1-33

When Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions appeared posthumously in 1782, the book met readers with an imagined scene of the author’s judgment before God:
Que la trompette du Jugement dernier sonne quand elle voudra; je viendrai ce livre à la main me présenter devant le souverain juge. Je dirai hautement...

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1. Representation in Heaven: The Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Rhetor Divinus

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pp. 34-62

The thirteenth-century Dies irae hymn, one of the period’s most well-known liturgical meditations on the Judgment Day, asks this haunting question: “Quid sum miser tunc dicturus?”¹ What am I, the wretched one, to say then, at the Resurrection and Judgment? What words can possibly excuse...

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2. A Particular Judgment: The Case of Deguileville's Pelerinage de l'ame

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pp. 63-101

As the Devil’s Rights tradition shows, the courtroom drama is not a recent invention, nor is it confined to legal proceedings on earth. Texts like L’advocacie Nostre Dame and Pierre le changeur fill the scene of divine judgment with outraged prosecutors, silver-tongued attorneys, and controversial...

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3. Post-Apocalyptic Judgment: Machaut's Jugement dou roy de Navarre

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pp. 102-143

Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300–1377) is usually, and with justice, considered the greatest French poet and composer of the fourteenth century. Machaut’s prolific poetic corpus combined lyric and narrative forms in innovative ways, his manuscripts were some of the earliest and most...

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4. The Judgment of Jupiter: Froissart's Joli buisson de Jonece

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pp. 144-188

Jean Froissart (c. 1337–1405) is today best known for his Chroniques, a massive work of French prose documenting the events of the first half of the Hundred Years War, based largely on the author’s personal reporting and interviews with eye-witnesses. Before becoming the most important historian...

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Conclusion: In Lieu of a Last Judgment

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pp. 189-208

In the thirteenth century, vernacular poets began to shape detailed poetic personae around an acute awareness of the Judgment, evoking the great and terrible reckoning in order to mark the renunciation of earlier poetry and to call audiences to repentance. At the same time, some of these...

Bibliography

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pp. 209-227

Index

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p. 228

Other Titles in the Series

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Back Cover

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