Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-2

read more

Preface

Frank Scotton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-2

Acclivity is ascending terrain. On maps the proximity of topographical lines indicates relative steepness. For the United States of America, and especially for us serving in Viet Nam from 1960 through 1975, the conflict had a certain “uphill battle” aspect throughout the war. Struggling through...

read more

1. Initiation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-26

We all get two kinds of toilet training. The first is applied by parents and accomplished (maybe with difficulty) at such an early age we have no memory of it when having our turn with the next generation. The second, what Ev Bumgardner called “adult toilet...

read more

2. An Lao Valley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-50

Ev placed me in Qui Nhon with the mission to travel throughout Quang Ngai, Binh Dinh, Phu Yen, and (when I could) Kontum and Pleiku. He said the USIS branch post in Dalat occasionally looked into southern II Corps but never got north of Nha Trang, and the consulate...

read more

3. Deterioration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 51-65

On 8 May 1963 there was an incident in Hue, the former royal capital, that, combined with irresponsible and futile Diem administration response, would have devastating impact on the fate of the First Republic. A scuffle between Buddhist activists and government...

read more

4. Demise of the First Republic

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-77

There were actually two Republics of Viet Nam. Ngo Dinh Diem and his family established the First Republic in October 1955 with advice and assistance from Americans, none more influential than Col. Edward Lansdale.¹ When President Diem was assassinated in November...

read more

5. Long An Hamlet Survey

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-88

I was, some would say, temperamentally adolescent, predisposed to defy authority. So how did Everet Bumgardner bring me to heel? First of all, I owed him loyalty, not because of an organization chart or pecking order of rating officer to rated, but personal loyalty. He taught me...

read more

6. Quang Ngai People’s Commandos

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-111

I first had to return to Pleiku for a meeting with Tuy and Jusiu to follow up on our discussions about replicating the 4th Company. Before getting pulled down to Long An, we were at the point of beginning recruitment for a Bahnar-based unit anticipated to operate entirely mobile...

read more

7. Expansion and Control Issues

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-127

During the first four days of Nghia Hanh training there was increasing tension between the two groups of instructor cadres. On 6 July, Tuyen, Uyen, and Xang asked to be removed from the project for return to Saigon. They explained that they did not understand the...

read more

8. Upgrading District Forces

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 128-143

I closed out of Dalat in late October 1964 and relocated to the south. Kim Vui also moved, retaining her family villa in Dalat but renting a small house in Saigon in order to resume her singing career. Bob Kelly was back in Viet Nam, employed by USOM and on loan to CIA while...

read more

Reflection, 1965

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 144-146

We were not aware the 95th and 32nd PAVN Regiments were already in II Corps and about to be joined by the 101st and 18th Regiments. I don’t think anyone on our side understood the nature of the quantum change that was occurring. Yes, we were introducing US ground forces, but I...

read more

9. Long Way Home to Central Viet Nam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-159

Bob Kelly was also taking home leave, and we planned to travel together. Our commercial flight made an unscheduled stop in Phnom Penh, then we bumped through cloudy skies most of the way to Hong Kong and an overnight in Kowloon. When we arrived in San...

read more

10. Binh Dinh Conflict

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-182

Bob Kelly was in Quang Nam province. Th e fall 1965 environment did not allow road travel, so I caught a C-130 up to Danang and then hitched a ride south to Hoi An. Kelly was enthusiastic about Marine Corps small unit operations, and particularly the initiation of...

read more

11. Roles and Missions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-194

I was feeling increasingly worn out, worn down, but attributed that fatigue to life on the run, perhaps complicated by my recent personal tailspin. Then one morning, while pissing in some bushes, I noticed my urine stream was coffee-colored. Whoa! I sought out a medic and...

read more

12. Office of Civil Operations/MACVCORDS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-214

One of the first persons I went to see aft er processing was, of course, Jake. He had license for a good-humored jab at my early return. Jake was the new mission coordinator, replacing Sam Wilson, who had transferred to Long An province to test, in person, the concept of...

read more

Reflection, 1967

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-218

It was hard to leave Viet Nam. I thought, just before departure, that I could love someone. John Vann said he expected me to be in and out of love but never married. But I had some honorable intent. She was the daughter of a prominent Saigon commercial/political figure. Her father...

read more

13. Away but Still Connected

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-242

Now it seemed my view of Viet Nam in late 1967 was from too far away, looking through the wrong end of a telescope. Friends sent letters describing changing circumstances and sharing their opinions. Since they told me what each thought most important, this chapter...

read more

14. Borneo and Return to Viet Nam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-254

China area and language study completed, and following the birth of my son (David Philip) while still waiting for final approval of “official” marriage to Sa Yun, I left them in the mountains with Sa Yun’s extended family and in early November 1969 flew to Kuala Lumpur...

read more

15. Headquarters MACVCORDS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-274

What did William Egan Colby expect from me? When we sat down to discuss specific responsibilities, he began by saying he prized flexibility. While duties would be specialized, my view of the Viet Nam scene should be catholic, and he expected me to identify...

read more

16. Adjustments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 275-293

My JUSPAO experience a few years earlier had been field-focused and punctuated by significant friction with senior officers who knew little of Viet Nam and resented my (relative to them) initiative and freedom of action. Now I had to cope with the opposite situation...

read more

17. Elections, Governance, and the 1972 PAVN Offensive

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 294-309

JUSPAO in the summer of 1971 was still a sizable organization. We had unplugged from the Ministry of Information, other than technical advising for television, and distancing ourselves precluded even an appearance of involvement in the August and September elections. But...

read more

18. Negotiations, Ceasefire, and Land Rush

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 310-320

I am rarely diplomatic, even less a diplomatic historian, but I think of those long, drawn-out DRV-US negotiations in Paris as having three distinct periods.¹ The first one aimed at achieving a post–Tet 1968 arrangement prior to the US presidential election of the same year. The...

read more

Reflection, 1973

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 321-327

You are on your own when returning for a domestic assignment, unless a friend helps you through reentry. Ev Bumgardner was always our friend. He met us at Dulles Airport, took travelers home to relax with Odette, Ginny, and Gene, and advised me to get off to a fast start on...

read more

The Last Chapter: Deterioration and Collapseof the Second Republic

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 328-336

We all know how the story ends. There are good descriptions of the 1974 and 1975 events. I am particularly impressed with the accounts presented by William Le Gro, Frank Snepp, and Tran Van Tra. I would not attempt to duplicate their excellent first-hand observations...

Appendix A. Long An Hamlet Survey Guidelines

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 337-338

Appendix B. The Nature of Irregular Warfare

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-342

Appendix C. Abbreviations and Terms

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 343-348

Appendix D. Persons of Interest

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 349-366

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 367-448

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 449-464

read more

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 465

From 1962 through 1975, Frank Scotton spent at least part of every year in Viet Nam. He retired in 1998 after three years as USIA assistant director for East Asia.

Image Plates

pdf iconDownload PDF