Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication, Quote

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

From 1876 to 1943, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg presided over the Battle Creek Sanitarium, an institution that, at its peak, was one of the largest and best-known health and wellness facilities in the United States, a “combination nineteenth-century European health spa and a twentieth-century Mayo...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

This book has been a long time in development. Originally, it began as a religious history of Battle Creek, in which my goal was to determine why, of all places in the Midwest, this small Michigan town became the birthplace of Seventh-day Adventism, today one of the largest of the many new...

Abbreviations

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pp. xix-xxii

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1. Battle Creek Beginnings

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pp. 1-29

In the summer of 1940 at the age of eighty-eight, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, seeking to record on paper some of the essential facts of his long life, cast his thoughts back to 1863, a time when Battle Creek, Michigan, was “a very small village of a few hundred inhabitants” and the great Battle Creek Sanitarium...

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2. The Rise of the Temple of Health

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pp. 30-61

In 1865 Ellen White had another important health vision. In this case, God commanded her to create a hydropathic facility in Battle Creek. Although Battle Creek boasted a water-cure establishment at nearby St. Mary’s Lake as early as 1858, White said that she first learned about the water cure in 1863...

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3. The Theology of Biologic Living

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pp. 62-81

Photographs of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg taken during the 1880s and ’90s show an avuncular figure with a full beard, still exuding the unbounded confidence of his youth. These were indeed decades of spectacular success for Kellogg, with the Battle Creek Sanitarium growing in popularity and...

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4. The Living Temple

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pp. 82-105

By the late 1890s Ellen White became deeply concerned about the growing worldliness of the Battle Creek Sanitarium, lamenting that it had “been perverted from its original design, until it resembles a grand hotel rather than an institution for the treatment of the sick.”¹ White saw the concentration...

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5. Dr. Kellogg’s Break with the Seventh-day Adventist Church

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pp. 106-132

May 31, 1903, was a gala day for Battle Creek. A little more than a year after the fire that had destroyed the original sanitarium building, thousands of people were drawn to the dedication ceremonies of the rebuilt Battle Creek Sanitarium. In its new incarnation the sanitarium boasted a...

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6. Dr. Kellogg and Race Betterment

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pp. 133-170

Despite John Harvey Kellogg’s very public spat with his brother over the cereal business, the reputation of the Battle Creek Sanitarium continued to grow, attracting even more of the rich and famous to its doors in the 1910s and ’20s. Other rival sanitariums had arisen in town to challenge the...

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Conclusion: The Fall of the Temple of Health

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pp. 171-176

As the Race Betterment Foundation faded from view in the 1960s, the Battle Creek Sanitarium was also heading toward a similar fate. Kellogg’s sanitarium had remained in a thriving condition throughout most of the 1920s, but by then the doctor was spending much of his time in Florida...

Notes

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pp. 177-220

Bibliography

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pp. 221-232

Index

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pp. 233-240

About the author

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p. 241