Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Introduction: What Is Abolitionist Geography?

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pp. 1-20

This book is an experiment in thinking about the archive of abolitionist spatial practice beyond the familiar stories of sectionalism and Manifest Destiny. Taking as its chronological touchstones British West Indian Emancipation in 1834, the U.S. Compromise of 1850...

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1. Emerson’s Hemisphere

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pp. 21-68

I begin with these epigraphs by way of an oblique approach to the temporal dislocations and spatial repetitions of abolitionist geography. The first comes from a private letter welcoming Ralph Waldo Emerson to what is described ironically as his native hemisphere following...

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2. August First and the Practice of Disunion

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pp. 69-98

As we saw in the previous chapter, New England abolitionists approached the micropolitical details of the British West Indian Emancipation process across an anxiously erected barrier of objections to what they perceived as new innovations in unfree labor that threatened...

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3. William Wells Brown’s Critical Cosmopolitanism

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pp. 99-124

The transnational circulation of both bodies and ideas was as we have seen both a given and a problem for radical abolitionism. Thus, as a matter of critical practice, any study of abolitionism that programmatically denigrates the regional for the transnational, or vice...

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4. Uncle Tom’s Cabin’s Anti-expansionism

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pp. 125-160

Uncle Tom’s Cabin is famous for taking up space. Not merely a long novel with formidable realist ambitions, Uncle Tom’s Cabin is also well known for exceeding the containers allotted to it both materially and culturally. Its serialization in the National Era ran long, its sales...

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5. The Maroon’s Moment, 1856– 1861

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pp. 161-188

Late in his 1859 book The Roving Editor: Or, Talks With Slaves in the Southern States, the abolitionist radical James Redpath introduces a particular piece of fugitive slave testimony with the observation that “[t]here is a Canada in the Southern States. It is the Great Dismal...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 189-190

It is a great pleasure to come at last to the point of thanking the many people and institutions that have made this book possible.
My greatest debt is to the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania, where this book first took shape. Nancy Bentley set an...

Notes

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pp. 191-224

Index

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pp. 225-228

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About the Author

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p. 229

MARTHA SCHOOLMAN is a scholar of antebellum U.S. literature and the literatures and cultures of slavery and abolition in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world. She is assistant professor of English at Florida International University. She is coeditor with Jared Hickman of...