Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

The present volume contains studies on Judeo-Arabic literature in Tunisia as well as several texts that have been translated into English. All of the translated works, which are intended to represent different genres, are included in the Hebrew version of this volume, published...

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1. The Flowering of Judeo-Arabic Literature in North Africa

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pp. 1-24

Judeo-Arabic literature first appeared no later than the sixth century CE, with the poetry of the Jews of the Ḥijāz (Al-Hejaz, located in present-day Saudi Arabia), the most famous poet being Samuel ben ‘Adaya. This literature blossomed after most countries where Jews...

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2. The Piyyutim (Liturgical Poems)

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pp. 25-73

Judeo-Arabic piyyutim (liturgical poems) have formed the most constant literary genre in North Africa, including Tunisia, since the Middle Ages. This contrasts with most other genres, including Judeo-Arabic secular poems, most of which are innovations of recent generations...

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3. The Malzūmāt (Satirical Ballads)

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pp. 74-108

The malzūmāt (sing. malzūma) are a new genre in Judeo-Arabic literature in Tunisia, written in the vernacular dialect, and they have nothing to do with the liturgical assemblages in the synagogue or the paraliturgical ones outside it. Therefore the Hebrew element in the...

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4. The Qinot (Laments)

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pp. 109-147

As noted in Chapter 3, the qinot (laments; sing. qina) and the malzūmāt were the most important genres in Judeo-Arabic literature in Tunisia in the first half of the twentieth century.¹ In this chapter we present five qinot. The first three qinot are satires written in the 1930s about...

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5. The Ghnāyāt (Songs)

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pp. 148-173

The ghnāyāt (songs) differ from the three genres discussed in the previous chapters, the piyyutim (liturgical poems), the malzūmāt, and the qinot (laments). Their origin is not Jewish, nor were they performed particularly at Jewish events. The ghnāya, the most suitable equivalent of...

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6. Essays on Ideology and Propaganda

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pp. 174-201

As far back as the Middle Ages, Jewish communities in the Middle East and in North Africa maintained the tradition of engagement in literary and spiritual pursuits not arising directly from study of the Bible and rabbinic literature. Not surprisingly, therefore, the rabbis of these...

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7. The Drama and the Theater

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pp. 202-222

It can hardly be said that drama was a genre of Judeo-Arabic literature in Tunisia. Nevertheless, Jews played an important role in the development of theater in general in Tunisia, and Jewish theater troupes had repertoires in all the languages in use at the time in Tunisia: classical...

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8. The Ḥikāyāt and Deeds of Righteous Men

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pp. 223-240

Anyone familiar with Tunisian Judeo-Arabic prose literature, quite a large part of which is translated from other languages, has no doubt pondered the enormous expansion of the genre of ḥikāyāt (stories) since the 1870s, along with other genres of literature in translation such as...

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9. Translation of Daniel Ḥagège’s Circulation of Tunisian Judeo-Arabic Books

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pp. 241-296

Ever since David Cazès published his Notes bibliographiques sur la littérature juive tunisienne in 1893 on rabbinic literature, followed by Eusèbe Vasselʼs La littérature populaire des Israélites tunisiens (1904) relating to Judeo-Arabic literature, the literary works of Tunisian Jewry have...

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Appendix 1: Judeo-Arabic Journals and Other Periodicals

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pp. 297-302

The following list of journals and other periodicals in Judeo-Arabic has been compiled from Ḥagège’s Circulation of Tunisian Judeo-Arabic Books compared to Attal (2007)...

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Appendix 2: Judeo-Arabic Books

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pp. 303-320

The following list of books in Judeo-Arabic has been compiled from Ḥagège’s Circulation of Tunisian Judeo-Arabic Books, Attal (2007), and other sources...

Notes

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pp. 321-344

Bibliography

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pp. 345-352

Index

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pp. 353-368