Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Just as in most difficult fairy-tale tasks, works like this don’t happen without a lot of magical helpers. Channeling Wonder originated with Jill’s suggestion to Pauline, at the American Folklore Society meeting in October 2011, that perhaps it was time for a book on fairy tales on TV...

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Introduction: Channeling Wonder: Fairy Tales, Television, and Intermediality

Pauline Greenhill and Jill Terry Rudy

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pp. 1-22

Television has long been a familiar vehicle for presenting fairy tales because it offers a medium in some ways ideal for the genre.¹ TV channels wonder when sounds and images literally float through the air and into television sets (and other devices) in homes, schools, and workplaces...

PART I: FOR AND ABOUT KIDS AND ADULTS

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1. Who’s Got the Power?: Super Why!, Viewer Agency, and Traditional Narrative

Ian Brodie and Jodi McDavid

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pp. 25-44

The children’s program Super Why!, a coproduction of the Canadian Broadcasting Company (CBC) and the American Public Broadcasting System (PBS), incorporates a variety of genres: the child-as-adventurer common to educational programming like Dora the Explorer and The Cat in...

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2. Merlin as Initiation Tale: A Contemporary Fairy-Tale Manual for Adolescent Relationships

Emma Nelson and Ashley Walton

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pp. 45-63

In fall 2008, a family drama called Merlin premiered on the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), opening: “No young man, no matter how great, can know his destiny. He must live and learn. And so it will be for the young warlock arriving at the gates of Camelot” (1, 2).¹ The series title and...

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3. Lost in the Woods: Adapting “Hansel and Gretel” for Television

Don Tresca

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pp. 64-81

Thus begins one of the most cherished fairy tales in world literature. “Hansel and Gretel” (ATU 327A) is so well known by nearly every European and North American reader that the opening sentence alone instantly conjures images: a dark forest, a trail of breadcrumbs, a gingerbread...

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4. Things Jim Henson Showed Us: Intermediality and the Artistic Making of Jim Henson’s The StoryTeller

Jill Terry Rudy

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pp. 82-100

Stories regularly appear at the same time and in the same space as the storytelling in Jim Henson’s The StoryTeller (JHTS), a live-action/ puppet series. In the first episode, “Hans My Hedgehog” (ATU 441), viewers initially see the old Storyteller (John Hurt) seated by a fire, dressed in...

PART II: MASCULINITIES AND/OR FEMININITIES

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5. Things Walt Disney Didn’t Tell Us (But at Which Rodgers and Hammerstein at Least Hinted): The 1965 Made-for-TV Musical of Cinderella

Patricia Sawin

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pp. 103-124

It’s February 1965, and I’m headed home from fourth grade at Flatirons Elementary. Despite my bulky winter coat, I’m waltzing up the sidewalk, pausing for a fleeting arabesque at the ballet barre/railing where I cross a half-frozen stream, singing the unutterably romantic “Ten Minutes...

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6. “Appearance does not make the man”: Masculinities in Japanese Television Retellings of “Cinderella”

Christie Barber

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pp. 125-143

During the Meiji period (1868–1912), after Japan ended a long period of national isolation and reopened to international trade, the works of the Grimm brothers and Hans Christian Andersen, among others, were eagerly translated for Japanese readers. Often, the translated fairy...

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7. Molding Messages: Analyzing the Reworking of “Sleeping Beauty” in Grimm’s Fairy Tale Classics and Dollhouse

Jeana Jorgensen and Brittany Warman

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pp. 144-162

The story of “Sleeping Beauty” (ATU 410) is one of the most consistently captivating fairy tales. It tells of a cursed princess dreaming in a tower, waiting patiently for her prince to rescue her. Those who recreate the tale for contemporary audiences spin the story anew, reconstructing...

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8. The Power to Revolutionize the World, or Absolute Gender Apocalypse?: Queering the New Fairy-Tale Feminine in Revolutionary Girl Utena

Kirstian Lezubski

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pp. 163-186

Japanese animation, or anime, has often collided or, to paraphrase Dani Cavallaro, colluded with the fairy tale (2011, 1; see also Jorgensen and Warman’s chapter). From Hata Masami’s¹ 1971 Andersen Stories to Dezaki Osamu’s 2005–2006 The Snow Queen, anime has often turned to...

PART III: BEASTLY HUMANS

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9. Criminal Beasts and Swan Girls: The Red Riding Trilogy and Little Red Riding Hood on Television

Pauline Greenhill and Steven Kohm

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pp. 189-209

The American comedy/crime drama Castle episode “Once Upon a Crime” opens with a woman in a Red Riding Hood costume running along a path through a wood (4, 17).¹ She turns, she screams. The scene changes, and writer Rick Castle (Nathan Fillion) and police detective...

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10. New Fairy Tales Are Old Again: Grimm and the Brothers Grimm

Kristiana Willsey

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pp. 210-228

These words appear superimposed against a backdrop of shadowy trees, illuminated by shafts of light. As the light dies and the forest darkens, the epigraph fades to black and the camera cuts to the first scene of NBC’s “fairy-tale procedural” Grimm: a sorority girl in a red hoodie setting out...

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11. A Dark Story Retold: Adaptation, Representation, and Design in Snow White: A Tale of Terror

Andrea Wright

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pp. 229-247

Well-known cinematic and televisual translations of popular fairy tales, particularly those from the Disney Studios, do not fully indicate their oral and literary predecessors’ sometimes dark and unsettling nature. Yet despite the misconception that the screen fairy tale...

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12. Judith or Salome? Holofernes or John the Baptist? Catherine Breillat’s Rescripting of Charles Perrault’s “Bluebeard”

Shuli Barzilai

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pp. 248-272

French filmmaker Catherine Breillat’s made-for-television movie Bluebeard (2009) concludes with a highly stylized scene.¹ Composed of an almost unmoving image, shot at medium range, it shows Bluebeard’s last wife, the lucky one, and the decapitated head of her husband on the table...

PART IV: FAIRY TALES ARE REAL! REALITY TV, FAIRY-TALE REALITY, COMMERCE, AND DISCOURSE

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13. Ugly Stepsisters and Unkind Girls: Reality TV’s Repurposed Fairy Tales

Linda J. Lee

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pp. 275-293

Though many recognize reality TV as a dominant aspect of television today, it has been part of North American culture since Candid Camera debuted in 1948. The turn of the millennium, however, witnessed a dramatic increase in reality TV thanks to the hugely popular Survivor and...

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14. Getting Real with Fairy Tales: Magic Realism in Grimm and Once Upon a Time

Claudia Schwabe

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pp. 294-315

Ever since the Harry Potter phenomenon engaged and inspired millions of readers all over the globe, the fantasy genre has gained new acceptance and appreciation among different age groups. However, the phenomenon stirred up an old question, raised time and time again...

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15. Happily Never After: The Commodification and Critique of Fairy Tale in ABC’s Once Upon a Time

Rebecca Hay and Christa Baxter

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pp. 316-335

Creator Edward Kitsis, asked why he and Adam Horowitz wanted to develop a television show about fairy-tale characters, answered that they “just wanted to write about something hopeful that for one hour a week allows one to put everything aside and have that feeling...

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16. The Fairy Tale and the Commercial in Carosello and Fractured Fairy Tales

Cristina Bacchilega and John Rieder

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pp. 336-360

One outstanding feature of television’s typical assemblage of narrative genres is that it resembles the set that emerged in late nineteenth-century print—romance as love story, adventure tale, detective fiction, Western, and so on—in tandem with mass culture itself. Most generic...

PART V: FAIRY-TALE TELEOGRAPHY

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17. A Critical Introduction to the Fairy-Tale Teleography

Kendra Magnus-Johnston

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pp. 363-378

As Lynn Spigel explains, the underestimation of television’s historic, aesthetic, and cultural value results in some rather inconvenient conditions for archival work. Spigel uses the Library of Congress’s description of its own collections to outline why early television records are...

Fairy-Tale Teleography

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pp. 379-402

Filmography

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pp. 403-406

References

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pp. 407-436

List of Contributors

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pp. 437-440

Index

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pp. 441-452