Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Front Matter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. I-VI

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. VII-VIII

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xvi

I first began this project in December 1996, thinking it would be a short article. Since that time, I have accumulated a considerable debt of gratitude to the many archivists and librarians who aided me with my research. I owe a special thank you to the outstanding past and present staff at the Connecticut State Library and Connecticut Historical Society...

read more

Introduction: “Clear My Name”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-9

With both “pleasure and pain,” William B. Turner reflected on the fateful day in July 1862 when he enlisted as a private in the 16th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. “I was among the first to enroll my name in Co. A under Capt. Pasco,” Turner wrote comrade George Q. Whitney in 1900, “and I venture to say there was not a prouder man...

read more

1. Camp Williams: “The Best Class of Volunteers”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 10-25

By midsummer of 1862, Abraham Lincoln’s war for the Union was more than a year old, and he desperately needed more troops. George McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign in Virginia had ended in a relative stalemate, and in the west, although significant strategic gains had been made, the Confederates showed no sign of abandoning their quest...

read more

2. Antietam: “Soldiering with a Vengeance”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-51

In late August, just outside Washington, D.C., the men were exposed to casualties for the first time, when they encountered ambulances returning from Second Manassas piled high with dead and wounded. The sight sobered and shocked the new volunteers. “This is indeed war,” Pvt. Robert H. Kellogg wrote in his diary...

read more

3. Fredericksburg and Winter Camp: “Sick of the War”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-69

Antietam was a harsh introduction to the realities of war for the 16th Connecticut. They emerged from their first campaign battered and severely reduced in numbers. There were lingering questions about their combat performance and concerns about regimental leadership. Now after weeks of inaction, the Army of the Potomac was on the move again...

read more

4. Newport News and Suffolk: “Regeneration”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-91

“Soldier life,” Pvt. Leander Chapin wrote his mother as the 16th Connecticut left the Rappahannock for Newport News, “is very changeable. Sometimes [it] is very hard indeed and then again it not so bad.” Chapin, who had joined the army filled with idealistic exuberance in July 1862, had begun to grapple with the realities of soldiering...

read more

5. Portsmouth: “A Perfect Village”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-118

The regiment arrived near Portsmouth, Virginia, on June 16, 1863, and settled into what appeared to be very comfortable quarters. One soldier wrote the Daily Courant just days after their arrival to report that their camp was about three miles from town, a spot previously occupied by the 22nd Georgia...

read more

6. Plymouth: “The ‘Rebs’ Took Us All”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-144

After three days of travel, the 16th Connecticut arrived at their new camp in Plymouth, North Carolina, around midnight on January 24, 1864. By the next morning, the soldiers began to take stock of their new post. Leander Chapin described it to his brother Gilbert: “It is a kind of barbarian place here, about 9 miles from nowhere...

read more

7. Andersonville, Florence, and Charleston: “Oh Horrors of Horrors!”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-173

On May 3 and 4, 1864, the men of the 16th Connecticut arrived at Andersonville prison. Robert Kellogg recorded the moment in his diary: “As we entered the place a spectacle met our gaze which almost froze our blood—our hearts failed us as we saw what used to be men now nothing but mere skeletons covered with filth & vermin...

read more

8. Roanoke, Camp Parole, and New Bern: “Another Day Gone and One Day Nearer Home”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-192

While most of their comrades endured imprisonment, Company H remained at Roanoke Island. This single company, ordered to leave Plymouth in the midst of the fight to ferry civilians away from the forts, stayed in active service until the war ended. The greatly reduced 16th Connecticut was now part of the District of North Carolina...

read more

9. Postwar: “They Were Heroes”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-225

In the late summer and early fall of 1865, four members of the 16th C.V., Robert Kellogg, Andrew Spring, Augustus Moesner, and Hiram Buckingham, served as witnesses in the trial of the former commandant of Andersonville, Capt. Henry Wirz. Learning that the besieged captain was imprisoned in the Old Capitol Prison, Kellogg had thoughts of trying to see him...

read more

Conclusion: “Only Remembered by What I Have Done”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 226-228

By September 1931, sixty-nine years after the regiment fought at Antietam in 1862, a mere five men attended the 16th Connecticut’s annual reunion. The year before, ten veterans had made it, including Jacob Bauer, but now only five of the twelve members still living were well enough to be present. The old soldiers regretfully agreed that this would be their last reunion...

read more

Appendix: Cast of Main Characters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-234

While this study is not meant to be a comprehensive unit history of a regiment, it does try to provide a sense of the 16th Connecticut’s regimental “personality” by highlighting several specific members’ lives and attitudes as the war progressed and in the years after. I selected these men for a number of reasons, not the least of which was that each left behind enough personal papers...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-352

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 353-370

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 371-380

Image Plates

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 381-388