Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-viii

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xix

There is an old Mississippi story about politics in the post—Civil War era. John Mills Allen was a candidate for state representative from Lee County, the region where the Confederate army had assembled before the battle of Shiloh. His opponent was a proud old man who had been a general in that army. At one of the debates the general...

read more

1. Thou Preparest a Table Before Me

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-23

Who knows how to drive a truck?" First Platoon of K Company was standing in the morning formation at Solingen-Wald, near Dlisseldorf, about six weeks after the war in Europe had ended. I had been back with the platoon for about a week but had soldiered with it for over a year, long enough

read more

2. Valley of the Roses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 24-37

I was sitting in company headquarters helping Bill Henry make up gossip about when and whether the division would be sent home for redeployment. Rapid redeployment meant a thirty-day furlough, report back to San Francisco, and head for the invasion of Japan. Some of...

read more

3. Useful Articles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-54

I remember most of the people in Rosenthal as being friendly, hardworking, and drab. The town barber showed a little color. He would listen carefully to our instructions as to the type of cut we wanted, and then give us the standard European-style cut. He had learned a few English phrases, which he used so randomly...

read more

4. Infantry, Pass in Review!

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-73

Carl Nance and I were in Pilsen on the day that Japan surrendered. I can't remember why we were there, except to take a break from the excitement of Rosenthal. There was an army hospital in Pilsen where the doctors were bored and would cooperate with any sort of excuse offered by GIs who wanted to get a taste of city life. Once, I had...

read more

5. Combat Troops

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-116

I was transferred to the 243d Field Artillery Battalion at Bad Aibling, a small town about thirty miles east of Munich. The battalion was quartered in what had been a large Luftwaffe training base for fighter pilots. The official name had been Flughorst Kaserne. Flug referred to fliers and horst meant "eagle's nest." Most of the Germans in Bad Aibling called...

read more

6. Somewheres East of Suez

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-140

My work crew told fascinating tales about the old days before Miracle Muller had come. None of them had been in the camp that long, but stories of pre-Muller times had become legendary. Except for that chaotic first week when nobody had food or shelter, the GI guards had been, well, GIs. The war was over and they saw no point in following regulations that didn't make sense. One of the prisoners, who was from...

read more

7. For Thus Shall the Lord Do

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-149

On my next visit Anna said, "Wait here, Leon, the girls have a surprise for you." Inge came out wearing a man's hat and carrying a stick that she used as a cane. With my high starched collar, and my high-topped shoes, and my hair piled high on my head, I went to spend a jolly hour on the...

read more

8. Showtime!

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-173

When I arrived, the Bad Aibling base was part of a good vaudeville circuit. A young woman named Maria had contracted with Special Services to give weekly shows along a string of four or five American bases that included ours. We were used to the dull USO shows with their...

read more

9. Never Sheathe It Without Honor

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-189

The last chapter may sound as if my Munich activities centered around visits with Sam'Le' and Fats at the quartermaster company. They didn't. My primary Munich enterprise had an entirely different focus. I visited the quartermaster boys when I was in Munich on other business. Because I was stationed...

read more

10. And the Lives You Lived Were Mine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 190-198

I suppose Bridget wondered why I suddenly stopped coming by. The "Eh, Ami" experience had absolutely terrified me. On my next visit to the Black Tomcat, I impressed the boys with my stupidity. Fats said, "Charlie, I told you to stay away from those wild women." Lili took on a very serious tone in telling me to stay...

read more

Afterword and Thanks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-206

I wrote this "with a little help from my friends." To be honest, it was more than a little help—so much that I don't know where to start. Giinter Bischof, associate director of the Eisenhower Center at the University of New Orleans, continuously helped and encouraged me with the manuscript—to the point of taking an early draft with him...

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-209