Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword: One Thing about Television and Ten Things about Canadian TV

John Doyle

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pp. vii-xv

Simply put, I believe in the benign influence of the medium. I’ve been a TV viewer since the age of four and a TV critic for more than a decade. When I began writing about television there was still a widespread belief among educated, well-intentioned readers of The Globe and Mail that TV was an instrument...

Part I: Television Studies in the Canadian Context: Challenges and New Directions

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Introduction

Marian Bredin, Scott Henderson, Sarah A. Matheson

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pp. 3-20

In 1987, Mary Jane Miller introduced her groundbreaking study of Canadian television drama production with the obligatory review of existing literature in the field. Finding this literature somewhat wanting, she pointed out that
no one has been taking a systematic look at whether the television drama...

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1. From Kine to Hi-Def: A Personal View of Television Studies in Canada

Mary Jane Miller

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pp. 21-38

I am always amazed at the number of my university colleagues who don’t watch television and are proud of it. I am surprised when a scholar writing about television makes clear that what gives it value must exclude what entertains. Television still connotes for many in our environment “mindless...

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2. (Who Knows?) What Remains to Be Seen: Archives, Access, and Other Practical Problems for the Study of Canadian “National” Television

Jennifer Vanderburgh

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pp. 39-58

Canada has a tradition of archival and rhetorical support that enables the study of film, but the same is not true of television.1 This chapter outlines why this is the case and makes the point that pragmatic conditions have prescriptive effects on how (or whether) so-called “national” television...

Part II: Contexts of Television Production in Canada

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3. Television, Film, and the Canadian Star System

Liz Czach

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pp. 61-72

The 2009 release of Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day (Mike Clattenburg) is the most recent attempt to translate a successful English- Canadian television series into a big-screen triumph. Countdown to Liquor Days, like its predecessor, Trailer Park Boys: The Movie, follows in the tradition...

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4. Producing Aboriginal Television in Canada: Obstacles and Opportunities

Marian Bredin

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pp. 73-94

Television produced by and for Aboriginal peoples is a new content stream within the rapidly diversifying Canadian industry. Aboriginal television is still at a formative stage but gaining strength and momentum with the creation of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN). Launched in 1999...

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5. Hypercommercialism and Canadian Children’s Television: The Case of YTV

Kyle Asquith

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pp. 95-112

This Chapter Explores the strategies that Canada’s YTV uses to integrate advertising and content across its broadcast and non-broadcast platforms. Although YTV was born out of a boom in children’s marketing in the late 1980s, it has recently climbed to a new plateau of commercialism...

Part III: Contexts of Criticism: Genre, Narrative, and Form

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6. Canadianizing Canadians: Television, Youth, Identity

Michele Byers

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pp. 115-134

In this chapter, I interrogate several Canadian TV series—Degrassi Junior High (1987–89), Degrassi High (1989–91), Ready or Not (1993–97), Drop the Beat (2000–1), Degrassi: The Next Generation (2001–), and renegadepress.com (2004–)—that explore myths of Canadianness through the production of narratives...

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7. How Even American Reality TV Can Perform a Public Service on Canadian Television

Derek S. Foster

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pp. 135-152

Reality TV is popular television fare. And while the content of reality television may not always be edifying or enlightening, it is important to recognize that Canadians can be enlightened by the public debate surrounding reality programming on Canadian television. We learn about ourselves not...

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8. Television, Nation, and the Situation Comedy in Canada: Cultural Diversity and Little Mosque on the Prairie

Sarah A. Matheson

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pp. 153-172

The October 22, 2007, issue of Maclean’s magazine featured a striking cover photo that depicted a Muslim woman wearing a hijab and a Caucasian man clad in a business suit. They stand side by side, facing forward, yet peering at each other out of the corner of their eyes, their respective glares...

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9. “Come On Eileen”: Making Shania Canadian Again

Scott Henderson

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pp. 173-190

Marc Horton’s review of Jerry Ciccoritti’s 2005 biopic Shania: A Life in Eight Albums, which aired on the CBC, is fairly typical of the generally negative response that greeted the film, both in print and online. Yet, at the same time, Horton manages to identify many of the key components that would...

Bibliography

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pp. 191-208

Contributors

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pp. 209-212

Index

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pp. 213-222