Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

Abbreviations and Principal Translations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-2

This volume assembles several essays around a common, albeit easily overlooked topic in Immanuel Kant’s thought: the issue of language and its importance in shaping the landscape of his critical philosophy. To be sure, language can be viewed as a formal structure of thought and...

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Introduction: Situating the Problem of Language in Kant’s Thought - Frank Schalow and Richard Velkley

Frank Schalow and Richard Velkley

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pp. 3-26

Among modern philosophers, Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) probably influenced the development of contemporary philosophy as much as anyone. Yet, ironically, where the issue of language has become a key fulcrum of Continental philosophy in the twentieth century, Kant is...

Part 1. The Question of Language

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1. The Place of Language: From Kant to Hegel

Robert Wood

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pp. 29-52

Kant’s third Critique, the Critique of the Power of Judgment, is divided into two parts: an aesthetic part and a teleological part, both under the general rubric of purposiveness.1 In the aesthetic part he focuses upon the universal communicability of the peculiar feelings of the beautiful and the...

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2. The Language of Time in Kant’s Transcendental Schematism

Frank Schalow

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pp. 53-69

Undoubtably one of the ironies in Kant’s work is that while he frames his project of the Critique of Pure Reason in terms of the question “how are synthetic a priori judgments possible?” he says very little about language in the way that we ordinarily describe it. If his critical philosophy allows...

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3. Language in Kant’s Practical Philosophy

Chris W. Surprenant

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pp. 70-80

Perhaps the most puzzling passage in the entirety of Kant’s moral philosophy can be found at 4:397 of the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals. Here, at beginning of his examination of actions done from duty, Kant writes, “I here pass over all actions that are already recognized as...

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4. Kant’s Philosophy of Language?

Michael N. Forster

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pp. 81-104

As is by now fairly well known, an intellectual revolution of sorts occurred in Germany during the second half of the eighteenth century which gave birth to the philosophy of language as we have known it since.1 The main protagonists of that revolution were Hamann and Herder...

Part 2. The Concern for Language in Religion, Politics, and Aesthetics

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5. Jupiter’s Eagle and the Despot’s Hand Mill: Two Views of Metaphor in Kant

Kirk Pillow

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pp. 107-133

Metaphor- makers wrench concepts from their customary uses in order to propose affinities that our habits of conceptual sorting overlook. They defy conceptual rules by applying terms beyond their accepted domains, as in the claim “love is war,” where “war” illumines a world of romance...

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6. Models and “Symbolic Hypotyposis”: Kant on Music and Language

Charles Nussbaum

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pp. 134-153

In a remarkable passage in the Critique of Judgment (KU, AA 5:328) Kant draws a parallel between music and what he calls the “affective tone” of speech.2 He first asserts that “every expression of language has, in context, a tone that is appropriate to its sense” and that “this tone more...

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7. Kant’s Apophaticism of Finitude: A Grammar of Hope for Speaking Humanly of God

Philip J. Rossi, S.J.

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pp. 154-173

Kant rarely frames his discussions of God, faith, and religion in terms that explicitly focus on questions about the structure, use, and limits of religious language, matters that have come to be of major concern to later philosophers of religion. His relative neglect of questions of religious...

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8. Nachschrift eines Freundes: Kant on Language, Friendship, and the Concept of a People

Susan Shell

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pp. 174-202

Kant’s brief Postscript of a Friend (Nachschrift eines Freundes) serves as a peculiar coda to his life work.1 The last of Kant’s writing to be published during his lifetime, it is both a friendly endorsement of Christian Gottlieb Mielcke’s newly completed Lithuanian-German and German-Lithuanian Dictionary

Part 3. Historical Perspectives on Language

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9. Reason, Idealism, and the Category: Kantian Language in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Robert Berman

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pp. 205-236

One way to further reflection on the linguistic dimension of a philosopher’s thought is to consider how his language enters into the problematic of another philosopher’s inquiry. Here we take up the case of Hegel’s use of Kantian language in his Phenomenology of Spirit (PS),1 which...

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10. The Language of Natural Silence: Schelling and the Poetic Word After Kant

Jason M. Wirth

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pp. 237-262

This essay is a reflection on the question of language for Friedrich Schelling, a questioning that gathers momentum as an attempt to address the intelligibility of nature as an expression of the λόγος.1 As such, its initial approach will be perambulatory, both in terms of figures discussed (the Austrian novelist Hermann Broch and the medieval Tuscan...

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11. Language, Nature, and the Self: Language, Psychology, and the Feeling of Life in Kant and Dilthey

Eric S. Nelson

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pp. 263-287

In the introduction to the Critique of Judgment, Immanuel Kant maintained that the subject cannot theoretically know itself as a thing in itself.2 Kant denied the possibility of knowing oneself directly through intuition or theoretically through knowledge, at the same time as moral...

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12. The Inexhaustibility of Art and the Conditions of Language: Kant and Heidegger

Richard Velkley

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pp. 288-310

Kant’s effort in the three Critiques, viewed as a whole, is the overcoming of modern rationalism and its replacement by a new critical or transcendental rationalism. In what follows I wish to lay the basis for the claim that the treatment of fine art in the Critique of Judgment is one of the high...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 311-318

Contributors

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pp. 319-320

Index

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pp. 321-332