Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

Patricia Johnston and Caroline Frank

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

a book such as this is the result of much intellectual exchange and collaboration. We are thankful to the many people in our personal and professional lives who suggested topics and sources, debated ideas, and generously shared their research in the course of this project...

read more

1 | Emerging Imperial Aesthetics in Federal New England — An Introduction

Patricia Johnston and Caroline Frank

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

Dramatic shifts in national identity and international relations characterized the federal period in the new United States of America. Perhaps nowhere was this as marked as in New England, where shipping was the backbone of the economy and contact with foreign merchants...

Part One: Political Geographics

read more

2 | The Art of Tea, Revolution, and an American East Indies Trade

Caroline Frank

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-49

Although many historians have noted that one catalyst of the American Revolution was the 1773 Boston rebellion, a confrontation triggered by direct British shipments of Chinese tea, few historians have asked, why tea? A rich body of visual material referencing both tea consumers...

read more

3 | West from New England: Geographic Information and the Pacific in the Early Republic

David Jaffee

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 50-70

When james wilson made his terrestrial globe in 1810 in Bradford, Vermont, well up the Connecticut River and quite far from the commercial and print centers in the port cities, he paid particular attention to the voyages of Captain James Cook. He marked his label: “a...

read more

4 | The Forgotten Connection: The Connecticut River Valley and the China Trade

Amanda E. Lange

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-96

The impact of the China trade on inland rural areas has been far less studied than its effects on bustling urban ports. This essay of forgotten connections and overlooked stories of the inland China trade follows the Connecticut River, which flows 410 miles from its source at the Canadian...

Part Two: Commodities

read more

5 | Salem’s China Trade: “Pretty Presents” and Private Adventures

Jessica Lanier

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-118

In 1839, in the waning days of its East Asian trade, the port city of Salem, Massachusetts, acknowledged its last great source of East Indian wealth, Sumatran pepper, by passing an ordinance providing for a city seal that depicts a “ship under full sail approaching . . . a portion of the East Indies"...

read more

6 | “Shipped in Good Order”: Rhode Island’s China Trade Silks

Madelyn Shaw

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-133

In museum collections, garments catalogued as made of “Chinese silk” and dating from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries are typically embroidered crepes or satin damasks with distinctly Chinese designs such as peonies, auspicious symbols, or phoenixes. In contrast, the samples....

read more

7 | The Story of A’fong Moy: Selling Chinese Goods in Nineteenth-Century America

Nancy Davis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 134-154

Yankee enterprise never lags behind any demand,” said one observer in 1834.¹ And demand was up for goods “a la Chinaise” throughout the eastern seaboard in the early years of the Republic.² After the Revolution, American merchants’ opportunities to profit directly from the China trade...

Part Three: Domesticating Asia

read more

8 | Cultivating Meaning: The Chinese Manner in Early American Gardens

Judy Bullington

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-179

The gardener referenced by Abram English Brown in his 1901 publication about the early history of Boston was Andrew Faneuil, one of the first Huguenots to flee France in 1685, when the Edict of Nantes was revoked. In 1691, the governor and the Council of the Massachusetts Bay...

read more

9 | “Lavish Expenditure, Defeated Purpose”: Providence’s China Trade Mansions

Thomas Michie

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-194

Having emerged unscathed by the Revolutionary War, Rhode Island’s port of Providence flourished in the 1780s while the fortunes of its merchants expanded rapidly. The Brown brothers and other business partnerships such as Clark and Nightingale, firms established before the...

read more

10 | Fabrics and Fashion of the India Trade at a Salem Sea Captain’s Wedding

Paula Bradstreet Richter

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-206

At the age of eighty, Salem shipmaster and merchant George Nichols recorded the following recollection of his wedding day, an event that had taken place more than fifty years earlier, while he was on leave from sea in 1801: “I remained at home about two months, during which time...

Part Four: Global Imaginaries

read more

11 | Drawing the Global Landscape: Captain Benjamin Crowninshield’s Voyage Logs

Patricia Johnston

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-230

Over a long career as a master mariner, Captain Benjamin Crowninshield (1758–1836) commanded ships to and from India and many other world destinations.¹ Like other captains, in the practice of his profession Crowninshield kept detailed daily logs, which he interspersed periodically...

read more

12 | Capturing the Pacific World: Sailor Collections and New England Museums

Mary Malloy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-250

Americans burst into the Pacific Ocean at the end of the eighteenth century with an enthusiasm for exploiting resources and expanding trade, and within a few decades American vessels outnumbered those of all other countries. By 1820, there were arguably more ships from Massachusetts...

read more

13 | Beyond Hemp: The Manila-SalemTrade, 1796–1858

Florina H. Capistrano-Baker

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-264

The manila-salem trade is little known, but it made a significant impact on American tastes and visual culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. In addition to trading in lucrative staple commodities, Massachusetts entrepreneurs patronized Philippine art forms that...

Part Five: Global Productions

read more

14 | Osceola’s Calicoes

Elizabeth Hutchinson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-287

Much has been said about how European-American residents of federal New England fashioned the textiles acquired through their global trade networks into clothing that signaled personal identity and social status.¹ Less well-understood is how members of marginalized...

read more

15 | From Salem to Zanzibar: Cotton and the Cultures of Commerce, 1820–1861

Anna Arabindan-Kesson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 288-303

Between Salem and Zanzibar stretched a reciprocal trade held together by fibers of cotton. From the early to mid-nineteenth century, when American industry emerged out of federal-era international commerce, these port cities maintained a familiarity with each other that was visualized...

read more

16 | Luxury and the Downfall of Civilization in Thomas Cole’s Course of Empire

Alan Wallach

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 304-318

In the 1820s and 1830s, Revolutionary-era anxieties about the corrupting influence of overseas commerce reemerged.¹ Thomas Cole’s series, The Course of Empire, allegorized the widespread fear that luxury goods, especially goods imported from Asia, would undermine morals and endanger the...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-322

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 323-326

Images

pdf iconDownload PDF