Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

At the height of Reconstruction, N. H. Hotchkiss, the traveling agent for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, led a group of northern journalists on a typical tour of the defeated South. Hotchkiss believed that if only journalists from the North could be brought face-to-face with their white brethren in...

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1. “Go South”: Yankee Travel to the South and the Ruins of Reconstruction

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pp. 17-43

At a blue-gray reunion in Chicago in 1895, Confederate veteran General Stephen Lee announced to his Yankee listeners, “We invite you to invade us again, not this time with your bayonets, but with your business. Let the voice of your commercial travelers be heard in our land, the flying columns of your...

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2. From Old South to Old Spain: Flagler’s Resort Hotels and Sectional Reconciliation in St. Augustine

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pp. 44-87

In the late 1880s, Henry M. Field, a northern clergyman and editor, was advised by his doctor to spend time in Florida. In 1890, Field wrote of himself and his fellow Yankee sojourners to St. Augustine: “We do not feel that we are strangers here. . . . We are still at home, in the same country, under the...

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3. “On to Richmond”: Richmond and the New Dominion

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pp. 88-134

In 1901, at “Virginia Day” celebrations at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, Virginia governor Hoge Tyler took the pulpit to address the crowd. In a review of American history, Tyler called upon his audience, made up of people from all sections of the country, to recall not the bloody...

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4. “The Chicago of the South”: Atlanta and the New South Creed

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pp. 135-182

In 1886, A. K. McClure, a Philadelphia editor, observed: “Atlanta has every appearance of being the legitimate off spring of Chicago. There is nothing of the Old South about it. . . . The young men [in Atlanta] are not the dawdling, pale-faced, soft -handed eff eminates which were so oft en visible in the...

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Conclusion: The Legacies of Southern Hospitality

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pp. 183-188

As the preceding chapters have shown, between the Civil War and World War I, cities in the American South designed different versions of the past to encourage capitalist development, sectional reconciliation, and historical amnesia. St. Augustine’s leaders aligned themselves with the unfinished...

Notes

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pp. 189-228

Bibliography

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pp. 229-252

Index

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pp. 253-266