Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Series page, Copyright, Quote

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

This book has required extensive research in far-flung places that would not have been possible without generous grants from the Australian Research Council, which also provided a five-year professorial fellowship for Cassandra Pybus and a four-year postdoctoral...

read more

INTRODUCTION. Elisabeth and Her Sisters

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

Elisabeth Samson, a spinster aged forty-nine, had set her sights on becoming the wife of the organist of the Dutch Reformed Church in Paramaribo, the tiny capital of the colony of Suriname.¹ To this end, she had instructed her solicitors in the Netherlands to...

read more

CHAPTER ONE. The Free Colored Moment: War and Revolution in a Brave New World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-31

While the Seven Years’ War raged across the Atlantic world, a motley collection of British speculators, financiers, merchants, and other hopefuls bided their time. With the ink on the Treaty of Paris of 1763 barely dry, they fell over themselves to divide the spoils from...

read more

CHAPTER TWO. Bars, Brothels, and Business: Rachael Pringle Polgreen and Rosetta Smith

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-56

Europeans living or traveling in the Caribbean during the Age of Revolutions encountered many enterprising women of color. Most were poor hucksters or washerwomen who laundered clothes; others ran shops or market stalls; but some were much richer...

read more

CHAPTER THREE. By Labors and Fidelity: Judith Philip and Her Family

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-79

Judith Philip knew a thing or two about slaves; slavery had been part of her life since birth. For most of her adult life she personally had owned well over two hundred people. By 1833 she was one of the most successful planters in Grenada and the matriarch of an extended...

read more

CHAPTER FOUR. A Lasting Testament of Gratitude: Susannah Ostrehan and Her Nieces

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-102

In 1809 Susannah Ostrehan was dying. Just months before she had listed all the things she owned in her will. It was a lavish inventory, carefully recorded, with bequests to many people. There were many slaves in her inventory but of all the people she owned, the most...

read more

CHAPTER FIVE. The Queen of Demerara: Mrs. Dorothy Thomas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-125

In the spring of 1824 Lord Bathurst was surprised to receive a deputation from Demerara, an undistinguished colony on the northern edge of South America. Unannounced, a coach with six irongray horses drew up to the modest buildings that served as the office for...

read more

CHAPTER SIX. By Habit and Repute: The Intimate Frontier of Empire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-146

In August 1813, Robert Garraway had expectations. His father, the merchant John Garraway of Cadogan Place, Sloane Street, London, had died a few months before, leaving his estate, which included prime property on the harbor of St. George’s, Grenada, to Robert and his...

read more

CHAPTER SEVEN. Uncertain Prospects: Mixed-Race Descendants at the Heart of Empire

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-168

Judith Philip was buried with her eldest daughter on the steep slope of the Hillsborough public cemetery on the island of Carriacou. It was October 1848. Her funeral was a Catholic ceremony, a simple, somber affair, befitting Judith’s last wish that her passing be marked “with...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-180

In June 1821 a young englishman stepped across the mudbank of the Demerara River and strode along the flimsy wharf toward the warehouse and offices of John and William Pattinson. John Castelfranc Cheverley was fresh from England and had come to work as a clerk...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 181-214

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-230

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-244