Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Quote

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xliii

When modernist writers of the early twentieth century turned again and again to music, what Joseph Conrad calls the “art of arts,”1 they were not turning solely to Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Bach, and Mozart. (In any event, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Bach are hardly the docile musical creatures...

read more

1. Orchestrating Modernity: Musical Culture and the Arts of Noise

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-45

Hearing the noise of the marketplace as a symptom of deep economic distress, Marx’s Mr. Moneybags leads us, like Vergil leading Dante, from the surface noise of trade into the complex of labor. For Marx, the audible “noisy sphere” of trade resembles a “very Eden” of free choice and self-interested...

read more

2. Beating Obedient, Thinking of the Key: Adorno, The Waste Land, and the Total Work of Art

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-99

If Eliot, Stravinsky, Wagner, Marie Lloyd, Irving Berlin, Prospero and Ariel, and the writers of the “Shakespearian Rag” (Gene Buck and Dave Stamper) all walked into a bar, the result would be something like The Waste Land: the Grail Legend of which could have come straight from Wagner, which quotes...

read more

3. The Antheil Era: Ezra Pound’s Musical Sensations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 100-149

Throughout the Cantos, Pound speaks to and from the underworld through music, ideogram, and radio, embracing poetry as profane pleasure and as merciless social critique.1 The endpoint of a man who had long protested his belief in an “ ’absolute rhythm’ . . . which corresponds exactly to the...

read more

4. Joyce’s Phoneygraphs

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-190

At the first private performance of Ballet Mécanique, Joyce remarked that it sounded “like Mozart.”1 The claim offers a continuity with Pound’s Feldmarschall Hindenberg, who “Heard for the first time Mozart and asked what the noise was / all this god damned cultural nonsense” (XLI, 204)—but...

read more

5. Performing Publicity: Authenticity, Influence, and the Sitwellian Commedia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-234

In February 1922, Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell Sitwell gave a private performance of Façade: an “entertainment” featuring Edith’s verse and music by the young British composer William Walton. (For convenience’s sake I shall refer to the Sitwells by first name.) In an L-shaped drawing room at...

read more

6. Aristocracy of the Dissonant: The Sublime Noise of Forster and Britten

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-278

Even before Russolo’s Arte dei Rumori had undertaken to “conquer the infinite world of noise-sounds,” the narrator of Howards End describes Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony as “the most sublime noise ever to penetrate the ear of man” (26). And even before Cecil Barber’s “Battle Music,” Helen Schlegel...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-300

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-324

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 325-338