Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

Stephanie Kirk and Sarah Rivett

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pp. 1-22

From 1492 through the revolutions of the late eigh teenth century and early nineteenth centuries, Christianity took hold in the Americas. Subjected to persecution or seized with evangelical fervor and the promise of spiritual fulfi llment in new settings, friars, lay converts, ministers, secular clergy, and...

PART I: COMPARISONS

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Chapter 1: Religions on the Move

J. H. Elliott

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pp. 25-45

In his General History of the Indies, published in 1552, Francisco López de Gómara famously observed: “Th e greatest event since the creation of the world (excluding the incarnation and death of Him who created it) is the discovery of the Indies.”1 It would take time to realize the full implications of Columbus’s...

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Chapter 2: Baroque New Worlds: Ethnography and Demonology in the Reformation and Counter- Reformation

Ralph Bauer

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pp. 46-78

During the sixteenth century, Europeans displayed varied, conflicted, and often contradictory attitudes about the religions of the peoples whom they encountered in the “Indies.” Thus, while Christopher Columbus had famously claimed, in the (now lost) “Diario” written on his first transatlantic...

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Chapter 3: Martín de Murúa, Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala, and the Contested Uses of Saintly Models in Writing Colonial American History

David A. Boruchoff

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pp. 79-106

The provision of good examples has always played a key role in missionary endeavor, both to attract and instruct converts, and to memorialize the qualities of those who would assume this task. In the Christian tradition, the paragon in both domains is understandably the example set by Christ himself...

PART II: CROSSINGS

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Chapter 4: Transatlantic Passages: The Reformed Tradition and the Politics of Writing

David D. Hall

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pp. 109-130

“What must I know about seventeenth-century New En gland?” a doctoral student preparing his field exams in American religious history asked me a year ago. All too conscious of the tides that ceaselessly sweep in and out of “Puritan Studies,” I hesitate. But the student is already alert to my proclivities...

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Chapter 5: Dying for Christ: Martyrdom in New Spain

Asunción Lavrin

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pp. 131-158

The theme of martyrdom in Spanish America signified a revival of the experience of Christianity contending with pagans and nonbelievers that had previously played out in Europe as a saga that pitted Catholic manhood against diabolic forces and that promised the highest reward for its efforts. Thus...

PART III: MISSIONS

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Chapter 6: Believing in Piety: Spiritual Transformation Across Cultures in Early New England

Matt Cohen

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pp. 161-179

Piety has a central place in the study of colonial New England— and by extension, in the successive schools of thought about the origins of the United States and U.S. exceptionalism. It is part of broad arguments like Max Weber’s, for explaining the deeply felt emotional drive of a certain kind of capitalism...

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Chapter 7: Return as a Religious Mission: The Voyage to Dahomey Made by the Brazilian Mulatto Catholic Priests Cipriano Pires Sardinha and Vicente Ferreira Pires (1796–98)

Júnia Ferreira Furtado

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pp. 180-204

This chapter analyzes the mission to Dahomey undertaken by the Brazilian Catholic priests Cipriano Pires Sardinha and Vicente Ferreira Pires between 1796 and 1798.1 My aim is to raise provocative considerations about various aspects of the voyage, but I shall limit my discussion to the religious aspect...

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Chapter 8: Jesuit Missionary Work in the Imperial Frontier: Mapping the Amazon in Seventeenth-Century Quito

Carmen Fernández- Salvador

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pp. 205-228

Geography as a scientific practice developed in the early modern period in connection with the emergence of the new European empires.1 Chorography, a branch of geography devoted to the study of individual places—their inhabitants, climate, and vegetation—assured the specificity of knowledge required to...

PART IV: LEGACIES

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Chapter 9: “Reader . . . Behold One Raised by God”: Religious Transformations in Cotton Mather’s Pietas in Patriam: The Life of His Excellency Sir William Phips, Knt.

Teresa A. Toulouse

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pp. 231-251

Sir William Phips was a Maine-born ship’s carpenter, treasure seeker, and entrepreneur, who discovered a vast cache of sunken Spanish silver off the coast of Hispaniola in 1687. He was knighted by King James II, adulated in London and Boston, and later, by dint of his transatlantic fame and his military...

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Chapter 10: Between Cicero and Augustine: Religion and Republicanism in the Americas and Beyond

Sandra M. Gustafson

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pp. 252-264

Historical studies of the emergence of the modern republic focus on the Anglo-American world, and much of the scholarship proceeds on the assumption that the modern republic was the creation of Protestants, particularly dissenting ones. This assumption informs J. G. A. Pocock’s monumental...

Notes

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pp. 265-330

List of Contributors

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pp. 331-334

Index

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pp. 335-350

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 351-354

We began our collaboration on this project several years ago through conversations about our own work on religion in our respective fields of Early American and Colonial Latin American Studies. We began to identify provocative points of contact and divergence in our work on New England Puritanism...