Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

Peter Lurie

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pp. ix-xxxi

The most arresting moment in Absalom, Absalom!, literally and figuratively, is when Clytie blocks Rosa Coldfield on the Sutpen’s Hundred stairs. The moment is unique in the novel for several reasons, standing as it does as one of its few instances of actual physical contact, but also...

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Note on the Conference

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pp. xxxii-2

The thirty-seventh Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference sponsored by the University of Mississippi in Oxford took place July 18–22, 2010, with more than two hundred of the author’s admirers in attendance. Nine presentations on the theme “Faulkner and Film” are collected as...

Faulkner and Hollywood: A Call for Reassessment

Robert W. Hamblin

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pp. 3-25

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Images of Collaboration: William Faulkner’s Motion Picture Communities

Robert Jackson

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pp. 26-46

The script girl Meta Carpenter, who worked for Howard Hawks at Twentieth Century-Fox when she first met William Faulkner in 1935, was placed in as good a position as anyone to understand how movies were made in Hollywood.1 After her experience on Barbary Coast...

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Immemorial Cinema: Film, Travel, and Faulkner’s Poetics of Space

Aaron Nyerges

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pp. 47-70

David Trotter’s book Cinema and Modernism points in a promising direction for Faulkner and film studies. What Trotter nominates as “argument by analogy” has, until now, provided scholars with a choice method for comparing Faulkner’s fiction to the substance, grammar, and philosophy...

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Demystifying the Modern Mammy in Requiem for a Nun

Deborah Barker

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pp. 71-97

As this collection demonstrates, there are myriad ways to approach Faulkner and film. Perhaps two of the most typical approaches are examining the influence of cinema and screenwriting on Faulkner’s fiction or analyzing the filmic adaptations of Faulkner’s works. While...

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Faulkner and the Masses: A Hollywood Fable

Stefan Solomon

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pp. 98-119

Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, in a 1965 essay, suggests that the screenplay is not a freestanding object of inquiry, but that, in its bid to reach the silver screen, is instead a “structure that wants to be another structure.” Rather than trying to redeem the screenplay from its role as...

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Oprah’s Faulkner

Riché Richardson

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pp. 120-145

In the contemporary era, the Oprah Book Club has stood at the forefront in promoting an interest in reading groups and book clubs in the national arena.1 Given the profits that it brought to the publishing industry and its proven power to promote established authors and make...

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In Phantom Pain: The 1991 Russian Film Adaptation of William Faulkner’s “The Leg”

Ivan Delazari

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pp. 146-168

“The Leg” is marginal in William Faulkner’s oeuvre. Written in the midtwenties, rejected by Scribner’s in 1928 and first published in Doctor Martino and Other Stories in 1934, the short story was kind of smuggled by the author into the “Beyond” section of Collected Stories of William...

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Faulkner and “The Man with the Megaphone”: The Redemption of Genre and the Transfiguration of Trash in If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem

Phil Smith

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pp. 169-196

In William Faulkner’s 1939 double feature of a novel If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem, a number of images span the two independent and alternating stories of “Wild Palms” and “Old Man,” images such as mass market magazines, Parchman Farm prison, deer, and perhaps most strikingly...

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Faulkner in the Histories of Film: “Where Memory Is the Slave”

Julian Murphet

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pp. 197-219

In the thirty-two years since the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference last organized itself around the theme of Faulkner and film, each term of the conjunction has undergone significant transformation. No doubt Faulkner himself has changed, and it would be arguable that...

Contributors

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pp. 220-222

Index

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pp. 223-233